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Read a Post for The Archer’s Dilemma, or, Why the question “What will preK-12 students need to know and be able to do in 2028?” is timely and important right now!
 
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Commissions heal thyselves

Posted By: Dick Schutz on November 14, 2008
 
Q: “ Why in the world will we need to invest education dollars in preparing students with knowledge and skills that will be the domain of computers by the time they are ready to enter the world of work?”

A: Because that’s where all the Commissions that Rubin lists are steering “us.” The youngest of these Commissions has been in existence since 2002. Most were founded in the early 1990’s. And the American Association of Colleges and Universities and the Business Round Table have much earlier origins. They’ve brought us to where we are today.

Q: How in the world will we quit teaching and testing this knowledge and skills that are “at the center of US education policy, drives state learning standards for preK-12 students, is the focus of what it takes to earn teacher licensure and, therefore, shapes the purpose of nearly every domestic teacher education program.”

A: It’s pie in the sky, bye and bye.

Ray Kurzweil projects the technological changes that are likely forthcoming in The Singularity. Even if one discounts these predictions, the present status of information technology is such that it should be obvious that much instructional time is spent on cramming “knowledge” into kids’ noggins that is readily obtainable on demand on the Internet.

The members of the Commissions include the government, corporate, and education principals with power to effect modifications in schooling. What will these modifications be and when can we expect to see them?
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 Commissions heal thyselves by Dick Schutz on November 14, 2008
 
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