Home Articles Reader Opinion Editorial Book Reviews Discussion Writers Guide About TCRecord
transparent 13
Topics
Discussion
Announcements
 
You Are Here: Read an Article > View All Posts for the Article > Read a Post
 
Read a Post for 1:1 Laptops Transforming Classrooms: Yeah, Sure
 
Reply to this Post
 

* Differing pedagogies, differing tech uses

Posted By: Jim Julius on November 27, 2006
 
In my experience as an instructional technologist at a university, I would agree with much of Cuban's comments, even if he gives his observations and guesstimates a negative spin. The proportion of faculty who are using technology as part of student-centered/active learning pedagogies is small.

However, I question be the value in comparing K-12 teachers who are part of 1:1 laptop initiatives and the broad population of university professors. First of all, K-12 teachers are much more likely than university faculty to have an understanding of pedagogy and instructional design. The fraction of university instructors who do use technology in transformative ways are probably the ones most suited to comparison with K-12 teachers in terms of their awareness of effective pedagogical practices and their willingness to implement those practices. They also are probably the ones most likely to seek out professional development and technical/instructional design support, which (one would hope) would also be an integral part of any 1:1 laptop initiatives in K-12.

While I fully agree with Cuban that, generally speaking, the technological opportunities are greater in higher education, I think part of this discussion must be the differences in instructional approaches between K-12 and university faculty generally, and also between non-tech-using instructors, instructors using tech to support "traditional" (passive, information-transfer, lecture-oriented) teaching, and instructors using technology to facilitate active learning.
Thread Hierarchy
 Differing pedagogies, differing tech uses by Jim Julius on November 27, 2006  * 
     
    Member Center
    In Print
    This Month's Issue

    Submit
    EMAIL

    Twitter

    RSS