Kindergarten Education: The Development of Ideas in the Kindergarten


by Louise C. Sutherland - 1904

When we raise the question, "How shall we. develop ideas with young children?" do we mean, "How shall we help children to have ideas?" or are we considering a method of developing with them an idea about a particular thing? The first plan seems to belong to a comparatively early stage, and involves the child's activity; while the second, or that of developing an idea about a definite thing, although it can best be realized through the pupil's active participation, may result, in the case of an unskilled teacher, in an over-hasty supplying of information. The question, then, in the first place resolves itself into this: not "How shall we develop ideas?" but rather, "Do we aim with very young children to give them many definite ideas about things; or do we, on the other hand, seek to develop in them the habit of having ideas or, in other words, the habit of being thoughtful?"


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 5 Number 5, 1904, p. 25-31
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 9813, Date Accessed: 12/10/2019 12:14:12 PM

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