The Function of the University in the Training of Teachers


by James E. Russell - 1900

The direction of popular education has, until very recent times, been universally considered the peculiar prerogative of the church. The entire school system of mediaeval Europe was dominated by the Roman Church. The universities, as first planned, were ecclesiastical establishments, defenders of the faith, foundations of the church for the higher education of the clergy. Even in the purely professional schools of law and medicine the influence of the church was not wanting. Canon law was regarded as the main part of jurisprudence and the art of healing as the gift of God. The Latin schools were preparatory to university study. The common schools were in reality Latin schools without Latin; city magistrates might establish the schools, provide for their support and nominate teachers, but the church confirmed the appointments and supervised all school work.


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 1 Number 1, 1900, p. 1-11
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 9657, Date Accessed: 12/16/2019 12:07:03 AM

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