Recent Advance in the Professional Training of Teachers


by James E. Russell - 1925

Forty years ago teaching in this country was either a trade or a calling; it could hardly be characterized as a profession.1 As a trade, it was taken up by those who found it an easier way to earn a living than by domestic service or farm labor. Others accepted the call to teach as religiously as ministers of the gospel heeded the call to preach. Fine scholarship, combined with native ability and guided by high ideals, made great teachers. They were few and far between, but they were the salt of the earth. Their lives and works, their ideals and methods, are objects of our closest study in the effort to construct the science and art of education.


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 26 Number 10, 1925, p. 807-814
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 6007, Date Accessed: 12/7/2019 6:38:55 AM

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