The U.S. and Other Great Powers in International Interaction


by John Lunstrum - 1969

In a general sense, the major task of this chapter is to analyze Curie's "pathetic paradox" as it bears on overseas educational activities of the United States and other great powers. More specifically, such analysis requires a consideration of the following questions: (a) What are the motives of the several nations, and how may we assess them? (b) How have the Great Powers demonstrated their interest in overseas education in the 1960s? (c) What encounters have occurred between U.S. and British and between U.S. and French education as exported overseas? (d) What confrontations between the United States and the U.S.S.R. and the United States and China have occurred?


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This article originally appeared as NSSE Yearbook Vol 68, No. 1.


Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 70 Number 9, 1969, p. 220-249
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 19604, Date Accessed: 9/26/2020 11:55:29 AM

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