The Mass Media and Popular Culture


by H. Gordon Stevenson - 1980

A singular characteristic of life in the United States today is the extent to which people of all ages have access to systems of communication that deliver massive quantities of information. At least this is the case if we define information as any set of meaningful symbols or symbolic actions. The symbols are objects as diverse as the flag, Barbie Dolls, printed words, and the clothes we wear. They are also people who are real or imaginary. Heroes and martyrs, television stars, and comic strip characters all have symbolic significance. Transescents live in a world of symbols


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This article originally appeared in NSSE Yearbook Vol. 79, No. 1.


Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 81 Number 5, 1980, p. 74-93
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 19204, Date Accessed: 12/7/2019 4:51:23 AM

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