Learning to Teach for Social Justice


by Marilyn Cochran-Smith - 1999

As a central part of their learning, my students have written thousands of pages of inquiry about teaching and learning—pages that were almost always thoughtful and articulate, often compelling, and sometimes even brilliant in turn of phrase, use of example, or original weaving together of disparate threads of meaning. Programmatic emphasis on the construction of interpretive and political perspectives notwithstanding, the question my students inevitably asked was this one: “But what does teaching for social justice really mean—in a concrete way?” And its many variants: “What does it look like in the classroom?” “What do you actually do with the students?” “You can’t really teach for social justice with five-year-olds, can you? Don’t they have to be older?” and “When do we get to the part in the program where we actually learn how to do it?”


To view the full-text for this article you must be signed-in with the appropriate membership. Please review your options below:

Sign-in
Email:
Password:
Store a cookie on my computer that will allow me to skip this sign-in in the future.
Send me my password -- I can't remember it
 
Purchase this Article
Purchase Learning to Teach for Social Justice
Individual-Resource passes allow you to purchase access to resources one resource at a time. There are no recurring fees.
$12
Become a Member
Online Access
With this membership you receive online access to all of TCRecord's content. The introductory rate of $25 is available for a limited time.
$25
Print and Online Access
With this membership you receive the print journal and free online access to all of TCRecord's content.
$210


This article originally appeared as NSSE Yearbook Vol 98, No. 1.


Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 100 Number 5, 1999, p. 114-144
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 18727, Date Accessed: 6/13/2021 2:23:42 AM

Purchase Reprint Rights for this article or review