What the Research Tells Us About the Impact of Induction and Mentoring Programs for Beginning Teachers


by Richard M. Ingersoll & Michael Strong - 2012

This chapter provides a review of empirical studies that have evaluated the effects of induction. The chapter's objective is to provide researchers, policy makers, and educators with a reliable and current assessment of what is known and not known about the effectiveness of teacher induction and mentoring programs. A second objective is to identify gaps in the research base and pinpoint relevant questions that have not been addressed and that warrant further research.


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This article originally appeared as NSSE Yearbook Vol 111. No. 2.


Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 114 Number 14, 2012, p. 466-490
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 18394, Date Accessed: 7/17/2019 5:30:51 PM

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