Instructional Technology and the Teaching Profession


by Robert Bhaerman & David Selden - 1970

In the fall of 1968, I received a call from a representative of the Study of Instructional Technology in Washington, D. C. I was told that SIT would like me to do a paper commenting on teacher attitudes toward the introduction of electronic and other teaching devices. I felt that I would like to write such a paper, but I did not see how I could find the time. Also, 1 am generally opposed to the practice of ghost writing. By arrangement with SIT, it was agreed that I would collaborate with Dr. Bhaerman. Dr. Bhaerman and I discussed the general question of teacher attitudes toward technology in education over several lengthy sessions. Then Dr. Bhaerman set out to do the actual writing. While I generally approved of the result, there were points at which I wanted to add comment. Thus, the introduction is written jointly, while the body of the paper is written by Dr. Bhaerman. The material added by me is in italics. (D.S.)


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 71 Number 3, 1970, p. 391-406
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 1731, Date Accessed: 11/15/2019 8:24:51 AM

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