Autism and Neurodiversity: Toward a More Authentic Inclusion


by Kathleen Nolan - September 28, 2012

This commentary aims to advance the professional conversation around the need for greater acceptance and authentic inclusion for children with autism. I consider the emerging scholarly literature on the controversial concept of neurodiversity, which seeks to reframe autism as a positive neurological variation, and critically assess the conceptís potential as a framework for informing educational policy and community practice. In doing so, I challenge current models of inclusion in the field of special education, which tend to focus too little on changing the negative attitudes toward difference that often exist among the general education student population. Further, I call for new directions in community practice based on what I refer to as an ethos of authentic inclusion.


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record, Date Published: September 28, 2012
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 16887, Date Accessed: 12/15/2019 5:09:48 PM

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