Why We All Need Integrated Schools: A Critique of “Successful” Urban Charter Schools


by Zoë Burkholder - September 22, 2011

After visiting a "successful" charter school in Washington DC, I question why policy makers are so pleased with schools for minority children that focus exclusively on test-prep and strict discipline, comparing this to the rich educational offerings in suburban public schools. I argue that creating racially and socio-economically integrated schools, for all of its challenges and shortcomings, at least has the advantage of equalizing opportunity and derailing efforts to create an educational system that has one objective and one set of rules for poor minority kids, and a vast wealth of options and opportunities for everyone else.


To view the full-text for this article you must be signed-in with the appropriate membership. Please review your options below:

Sign-in
Email:
Password:
Store a cookie on my computer that will allow me to skip this sign-in in the future.
Send me my password -- I can't remember it
 
Purchase this Article
Purchase Why We All Need Integrated Schools: A Critique of “Successful” Urban Charter Schools
Individual-Resource passes allow you to purchase access to resources one resource at a time. There are no recurring fees.
$12
Become a Member
Online Access
With this membership you receive online access to all of TCRecord's content. The introductory rate of $25 is available for a limited time.
$25
Print and Online Access
With this membership you receive the print journal and free online access to all of TCRecord's content.
$210


Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record, Date Published: September 22, 2011
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 16546, Date Accessed: 4/1/2020 1:58:58 PM

Purchase Reprint Rights for this article or review