Reading the Tea Leaves in the Swing Districts: What the 2010 Midterms May Mean for Education on Capitol Hill


by Frederick M. Hess & Andrew P. Kelly - September 27, 2010

Education has a long tradition of bipartisanship in Washington. Politicians and pundits from President Obama on down are relying on this tradition to continue in order to attempt to reauthorize ESEA, extend Race to the Top, and enact other policy measures. Many contend that likely Republican gains in Congress will serve to bolster this legacy of bipartisanship. But a look at the upcoming midterm elections suggests that the odds that education bipartisanship will maintain its vaunted status in 2011 are looking bleak.


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record, Date Published: September 27, 2010
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 16167, Date Accessed: 10/21/2020 9:51:49 AM

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