Testing High-Stakes Tests: Can We Believe the Results of Accountability Tests?


by Jay Greene, Marcus Winters & Greg Forster - 2004

This study examines whether the results of standardized tests are distorted when rewards and sanctions are attached to them, making them high-stakes tests. It measures the correlation in school-level test resultsincluding both score levels and year-to-year score changeson high-stakes and low-stakes tests administered in the same schools in nine school systems. It finds that test score levels generally correlate very well, while year-to-year score changes correlate very well in Florida but much more weakly in other school systems. It concludes that the stakes of high-stakes tests do not distort information about the general level at which students are performing, and in Florida they also do not prevent the tests from providing accurate information about school influence over student progress.


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 106 Number 6, 2004, p. 1124-1144
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 11568, Date Accessed: 4/6/2020 1:49:10 PM

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