Standards, Accountability, and School Reform


by Linda Darling-Hammond - 2004

The standards-based reform movement has led to increased emphasis on tests, coupled with rewards and sanctions, as the basis for "accountability" systems. These strategies have often had unintended consequences that undermine access to education for low-achieving students rather than enhancing it. This article argues that testing is information for an accountability system; it is not the system itself. More successful outcomes have been secured in states and districts, described here, that have focused on broader notions of accountability, including investments in teacher knowledge and skill, organization of schools to support teacher and student learning, and systems of assessment that drive curriculum reform and teaching improvements.


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 106 Number 6, 2004, p. 1047-1085
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 11566, Date Accessed: 10/20/2019 9:08:14 PM

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