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You are invited to add your unique voice and perspective to a vibrant, forward thinking conversation around some of the most timely topics in the education sector.   We welcome sophisticated commentary, similar to that found in the world’s leading publications, that covers a wide range of education related topics and draws fresh connections to contemporary issues.  As a contributor you will both be invited to discuss topics of our choosing and have the exciting opportunity to create content of your choice around subjects that interest you as both a scholar and practitioner.  Let’s work together to move the conversation around education further into the future while reframing and evaluating scholarship of the past.




Commentary
by Nadine Dolby — 2018
In this commentary, the author reflects on her process of learning about a student’s life through a paper he submitted for class.

by Dorothy Slater & Robert Slater — 2018
The authors of this commentary argue that demarginalization does not go far enough in satisfying the principle of restorative justice, which demands that marginalized students be given access to a humanizing education.

by Nanette Watson, Rachel Jensen & Cindy D'On Jones — 2017
The purpose of this commentary is to emphasize the need for targeted reading interventions for kindergarten and first-grade students.

by James Hiebert — 2017
In this commentary, the author argues that scripted instruction, defined appropriately, should be the goal of researchers and teachers if the educational community wishes to improve classroom teaching over the long run.

by Jordi Díaz-Gibson, Peter Miller & Alan Daly — 2017
Ferran Adria is widely recognized as one of the best chefs in the world. As education scholars, the authors of this commentary have developed an ongoing collaborative research relationship that has drawn considerably from Adria’s approach. They suggest that this emergent Adria-inspired way of collaboration contributes to understanding international collaboration and can significantly inform other education researchers who similarly seek substantive impact in their fluid and complex settings.

by Amanda Mayeaux & Robert Slater — 2017
Response to Intervention is a collaborative, multi-tiered, school-wide approach created to provide effective interventions for students with learning disabilities. Most high schools implement RTI by setting aside a 30-minute period during the day for the intervention that teachers refer to colloquially as a “skinny." How the skinny is implemented does much to determine whether or not students benefit from the policy.

by Anthony Kunkel — 2017
This commentary examines the history of reforms, the realities of the vast amount of research on educational reforms, and makes a case as to why teachers need to unify and gain a sense of solidarity in demanding a voice in decision-making and policy.

by Richard Fossey — 2017
The Louisiana legislature recently passed legislation barring school districts from administering corporal punishment to children with disabilities. This is a small step toward total elimination of corporal punishment in public schools.

by Caroline Wylie & Christine Lyon — 2017
This commentary focuses on a proposal for sequencing teacher professional learning opportunities to develop a well-rounded understanding of assessment practices and processes.

by Francisco Ramos & Lillian Zwemer — 2017
Colleges and universities are grappling with the shifting and sometimes ambiguous meaning of career outcomes. Authors of this commentary use the biomedical doctoral training landscape to explore this problem and the specific considerations that must be tackled to accurately describe postgraduate employment realities.

by Sonali Rajan, Lalitha Vasudevan, Kelly Ruggles, Brande Brown & Helen Verdeli — 2017
This commentary investigates the role and responsibility of schools and surrounding communities in keeping students and faculty safe from gun violence on K-12 campuses.

by Julie Margetta Morgan — 2017
This piece argues that to prepare for Higher Education Act reauthorization, the research and policy community need more than just student and institution-level data: We need to dig deeper into how the Department of Education administers the federal financial aid programs.

by Nadine Dolby — 2017
This commentary examines the deeper social implications of sharing (and not sharing) food in the classroom.

by Jonathan Cohen — 2017
This commentary addresses key conceptions of and contemporary attitudes toward school climate and social emotional learning.

by Tiffany Flowers & Erin L. Berry — 2017
This commentary examines contemporary school policies restricting the hairstyles of Black children as echoes of the 19th century Black Codes in the American south.

by Richard Fossey & Robert Cloud — 2017
This commentary examines the conditions through which tenure protects professors, but can also be revoked, and specifically analyzes the 2017 Fifth Circuit court case of Professor Alexander Edionwe, who sued UTRGV president Guy Bailey when his tenure position at UT Pan Am dissolved due to the creation of UTRGV and closure of UT Pan AM.

by Christopher Holland — 2017
This commentary evaluates both the strengths and weaknesses of New York City's universal pre-K initiative and provides three recommendations for future action.

by Adam Attwood — 2017
This commentary explores interdisciplinary discussion of inclusivity in the study of the European Middle Ages and how medieval studies might be reconsidered for a new, inclusive middle school and high school social studies curricula.

by Tray Geiger & Audrey Amrein-Beardsley — 2017
In this commentary, authors introduce the idea of artificial conflation, as predicated by Campbell’s Law, and as defined by how those with power might compel principals to artificially conflate teachers’ observational with their value-added scores to purposefully exaggerate perceptions of validity, via the engineering of conflated correlation coefficients between these two indicators over time.

by Joy Erickson — 2017
This commentary responds to Burkholder’s commentary, Trump’s Educational Reforms Threaten to Destroy American Public Schools–Is That Such a Terrible Thing?, by arguing that there need be an emphasis on developing “reasonable” citizens from the very start of schooling. It also highlights several scholarly pieces depicting the conditions under which young children have organically participated in pluralistic, critical, and political dialogue.

by Jacob Elmore — 2017
This commentary analyzes practices in PLCs that can inhibit or enhance teachers’ learning about students and their data-driven decision-making.

by Lacey Peters, Stephanie Reinke & Daniel Castner — 2017
This commentary reflects on a dialogue among members of the Critical Perspectives on Early Childhood Special Interest Group (AERA). It examines the influence of quality improvement in early childhood as it relates to the impact of globalizing and neoliberal forces driving education reform.

by Pedro Noguera & Alexandra Freidus — 2017
Letter to the editor in response to Jonathan Zimmerman's commentary, "Education Yes, Propaganda No."

by Francisco Ramos — 2017
This commentary weaves together autobiography and education research to explore the challenges of getting into higher education.

by Nadine Dolby — 2017
This commentary examines the problem of educational inequality. It argues that we need to make changes beyond simply our schools if we want to have long-lasting and impactful educational reform.

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  • Suggest a Topic: We welcome your suggestions on the following: what issues would you like us to address; who would you like to see addressing them; what direction would you like us to go in?
  • Volunteer to Write a Commentary: If you are interested in writing a commentary for TCRecord, please fill out this short form.
  • Submit a Commentary: Do you have a commentary that connects contemporary issues to the world of educational scholarship in some way? Please submit your work using this link.

Upcoming Topics

Teachers’ commentaries provide an important perspective on current educational issues. If you are a K-12 educator, we welcome you to submit a 1,000-1,500 word commentary in which you draw on your experience to address problems and opportunities confronting students and educators.



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