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Chapter 10: Teaching to Empower: Social Justice Action Projects as Imperatives for Educational Justice


by Stephen D. Hancock, Ayana Allen-Handy, John A. Williams III, Bettie Ray Butler, Alysha Meloche & Chance W. Lewis - 2021


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 123 Number 13, 2021, p. -
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 23750, Date Accessed: 10/25/2021 1:14:04 AM
 
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About the Author
  • Stephen D. Hancock
    University of North Carolina at Charlotte
    E-mail Author
    STEPHEN D. HANCOCK, Ph.D., is an associate professor of multicultural education and assistant director of the Urban Education Collaborative at UNC Charlotte. His primary research foci include socioracial influences on autoethnographic methodologies, the impact of the PK–12 curriculum on racial identities of American students, and the exploration and analysis of the effects of whiteness on teaching and learning. He has recently published papers in Teachers College Record, Theory Into Practice, and Harvard Educational Review.
  • Ayana Allen-Handy
    Drexel University
    E-mail Author
    AYANA ALLEN-HANDY, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of urban education and the founding director of The Justice-oriented Youth (JoY) Education Lab in the School of Education at Drexel University. Her research seeks to advance educational, racial, and social justice through youth and community-led critical participatory action research. She has recently published articles in the Journal of Negro Education, Urban Education, Urban Review, Educational Psychology Review, and Theory Into Practice.
  • John A. Williams III
    Texas A&M University
    E-mail Author
    JOHN A. WILLIAMS III, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of multicultural education at Texas A&M University at College Station. His research centers on dismantling inequitable discipline practices toward African American students in K–12 schools. Additionally, his research investigates how to prepare and support culturally sustaining teachers. His recent article, “The Discipline Gatekeeper: Assistant Principals' Experiences With Managing School Discipline in Urban Middle Schools,” was just published in the Journal of Urban Education.
  • Bettie Ray Butler
    University of North Carolina at Charlotte
    E-mail Author
    BETTIE RAY BUTLER, PhD, is an associate professor of urban education and the director of the M.Ed. in Urban Education program at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte. Her research interests include education policy/reform and culturally responsive practices. Her scholarly research has recently appeared in publications including Theory and Practice, Urban Education, The Urban Review, and Multicultural Perspectives.
  • Alysha Meloche
    Drexel University
    E-mail Author
    ALYSHA MELOCHE is a PhD candidate in education leadership and policy at Drexel University School of Education. Her research interests involve critical approaches to access, social justice, and diversity in the fields of creativity, aesthetics, and art education. Recent articles can be found in the Journal of Creative Behavior, Children and Youth Services Review, and Art Education.
  • Chance W. Lewis
    University of North Carolina at Charlotte
    E-mail Author
    CHANCE W. LEWIS, Ph.D., is the Carol Grotnes Belk Distinguished Professor of Urban Education and the director of the Urban Education Collaborative at UNC Charlotte. His research interests include African American student achievement and the recruitment/retention of African American teachers. Recent articles have been published in the following journals: Professional School Counseling, Journal of Advanced Academics, Journal of African American Males in Education and Urban Social Work.
 
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