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“I believe in home language, but the tests don’t”: Addressing Linguistic Diversity Within Assessment Practices Across Literacy Teacher Preparation and Classroom Practice


by Katrina Bartow Jacobs - 2019


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 121 Number 7, 2019, p. 1-42
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 22699, Date Accessed: 8/7/2020 12:54:49 AM
 
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About the Author
  • Katrina Jacobs
    University of Pittsburgh
    E-mail Author
    KATRINA BARTOW JACOBS is an assistant professor of practice in Language, Literacy, and Culture within the Department of Instruction and Learning at the University of Pittsburgh. She is a former elementary school teacher, and her work centers on approaching literacy education and teacher education from a critical, equity, practice-based framework. Her current research focuses on the intersections of practice, theory, and policy; the ways that children are invited (or not) to demonstrate critical knowledge of texts; and the ways that teachers develop, make sense of, and enact reading and writing assessments of their students. Recent publications include “The (Untold) Drama of the Turning Page: The Role of Page Breaks in Understanding Picture Books” in Children’s Literature in Education, and “‘So why is it ok here?’: Literacy Candidates Grappling With Culture/Culturally Relevant Pedagogy in Urban Fieldsites” in Urban Education.
 
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