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Immigrant-Origin Students in Community College: How Do They Use Their Time on Campus?


by Edwin Hernandez, Carola Suárez-Orozco, Janet Cerda, Olivia Osei-Twumasi, Monique Corral, Yuliana Garcia, Dalal Katsiaficas & Nidia Ruedas-Gracia - 2019


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 121 Number 7, 2019, p. 1-48
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 22698, Date Accessed: 10/26/2021 6:21:42 PM
 
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About the Author
  • Edwin Hernandez
    University of California, Los Angeles
    E-mail Author
    EDWIN HERNANDEZ is an assistant professor in the Counseling and Guidance program in the Department of Special Education, Rehabilitation and Counseling at California State University, San Bernardino. He is also a researcher for the Institute for Immigration, Globalization and Education at the University of California, Los Angeles. His research examines issues of equity and access in education, with a focus on institutional culture and how it shapes students’ experiences across the educational pipeline. Recent publications include:

    (1) Hernandez, E. (2017). Redefining the experiences of students in continuation high schools: A narrative profile of a Latino youth. The High School Journal, 100(4), 264–281. https://doi.org/10.1353/hsj.2017.0012. This study draws on a larger sociocultural framework and ecological theories to understand how one Latino male navigates various ecological spaces (i.e., home, school, and neighborhood) and how they shape the way he engages in a continuation school.

    (2) Suárez-Orozco, C., Katsiaficas, D., Birchall, O., Alcantar, C. M., Hernandez, E., Garcia, Y., . . . Teranishi, R. T. (2015). Undocumented undergraduates on college campuses: Understanding their challenges, assets, and what it takes to make an undocufriendly campus. Harvard Educational Review, 85(3), 427–463. https://doi.org/10.17763/0017-8055.85.3.427. This article examines how to improve the experiences of undocumented undergraduate students across a variety of higher education institutions. Using an ecological framework that accounts for risk and resilience, this study highlights the challenges undocumented students face and the assets they bring as they navigate their educational contexts.

  • Carola Suárez-Orozco
    University of California, Los Angeles
    E-mail Author
    CAROLA SUÁREZ-OROZCO is a professor of human development and psychology at UCLA and co-founder of Re-Imagining Migration. Her research has focused on immigrant families and youth, educational achievement among immigrant-origin youth, immigrant family separations, gendered experiences of immigrant youth, and immigrant-origin youth in community college settings.
  • Janet Cerda
    University of California, Los Angeles
    E-mail Author
    JANET CERDA is a doctoral candidate in human development and psychology at UCLA and a graduate student researcher at a UCLA-partnered K–12 community school. Her current research focuses on exploring the language learning experiences and the biliteracy development of immigrant children and youth over time, designing adaptive formative assessment practices for multilingual immigrant children and youth, and documenting K–12 multilingual and multicultural teaching practices.
  • Olivia Osei-Twumasi
    University of California, Los Angeles
    E-mail Author
    OLIVIA OSEI-TWUMASI is a lecturer in the Department of Economics at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her research has examined various aspects of the community college experience as well as transfer and graduation rates of community college students.
  • Monique Corral
    University of California, Los Angeles
    E-mail Author
    MONIQUE CORRAL is a doctoral candidate in the Human Development and Psychology program in the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies at UCLA, and a research associate for the Institute for Immigration, Globalization, and Education. Her research interests center on the education trajectories and career development of underserved students in urban schools.
  • Yuliana Garcia
    University of California, Los Angeles
    E-mail Author
    YULIANA GARCIA is a doctoral student in the Human Development and Psychology program and research associate for the Institute for Immigration, Globalization, and Education at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her research interests include focusing on the psychological well-being of immigrant-origin youth and issues related to the education of students of color across the educational pipeline. 
  • Dalal Katsiaficas
    University of Illinois at Chicago
    E-mail Author
    DALAL KATSIAFICAS is an assistant professor of educational psychology in the College of Education at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Her current research focuses on exploring the social development of immigrant-origin youth in a variety of educational settings, with regard to the development of multiple identities and social and academic engagement.
  • Nidia Ruedas-Gracia
    Stanford University
    E-mail Author
    NIDIA RUEDAS-GRACIA is a doctoral candidate in the Developmental and Psychological Sciences department at the Stanford University Graduate School of Education. Her research interests include exploring the association between sense of belonging and both academic and well-being outcomes among college students from historically marginalized groups, e.g., first-generation/low-income (FLI) college students. Starting in the Fall of 2019 Nidia will begin her appointment as an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
 
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