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Historical Perspectives on Diverse Asian American Communities: Immigration, Incorporation, and Education


by Susan J. Paik, Stacy M. Kula, L. Erika Saito, Zaynah Rahman & Matthew A. Witenstein - 2014


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 116 Number 8, 2014, p. 1-45
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 17512, Date Accessed: 8/7/2020 7:45:04 PM
 
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About the Author
  • Susan Paik
    Claremont Graduate University
    E-mail Author
    SUSAN J. PAIK, PhD, is an associate professor at Claremont Graduate University. Her research interests include minority learning and achievement, urban and international studies, educational and human productivity, family-school-community partnerships, research methods, and evaluation. Dr. Paik has several publications on minority and immigrant students and their schooling experiences including Narrowing the Achievement Gap: Strategies for Educating Latino, Black, and Asian Students (Springer, 2007), and “Minority Families and Schooling,” a chapter in the Handbook on Family and Community Engagement supported by the U.S. Department of Education (Academic Development Institute, 2011).
  • Stacy Kula
    Claremont Graduate University
    E-mail Author
    STACY M. KULA, PhD, received her doctorate from Claremont Graduate University. Her research interests include immigrant and minority education, achievement gaps, parent/community/school relationships, and effective teaching and teacher training. As a former teacher, she has worked with diverse immigrant and minority populations. As an adjunct instructor at CGU, she has also prepared teachers to work with diverse populations. Among several working papers, Stacy's dissertation work analyzed achievement factors for working-class second-generation Latino students at elite universities.
  • L. Erika Saito
    Claremont Graduate University
    E-mail Author
    L. ERIKA SAITO is a PhD candidate at Claremont Graduate University. Her research interests include Asian Americans in education, ethnic identity and generational status, K–12 English learner populations, and teaching strategies in English learner classrooms. Erika is also a high school English Literature teacher, serving an international student population as well as an adjunct instructor at Pepperdine University’s Graduate School of Education & Psychology where she teaches courses on human development and teaching English learners.
  • Zaynah Rahman
    Claremont Graduate University
    E-mail Author
    ZAYNAH RAHMAN, PhD, received her doctorate from the School of Educational Studies at Claremont Graduate University. Her research focuses on immigrant students, out-of-school factors impacting learning (home environment, parent involvement, after-school activities), college preparation, and international education issues. She recently published a coauthored paper on South Asian American college students in Ethnic and Racial Studies.
  • Matthew Witenstein
    Claremont Graduate University
    E-mail Author
    MATTHEW A. WITENSTEIN is a PhD candidate at Claremont Graduate University. His research focuses on comparative and international education issues including immigrant education, educational development, achieving successful pathways through the educational system, and international student perspectives. He recently coauthored papers on South Asian American college students in Ethnic and Racial Studies and developed a conceptual model to examine gender inequality in Nepali higher education participation in Asian Education and Development Studies.
 
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