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School Composition and Context Factors That Moderate and Predict 10th-Grade Science Proficiency


by Mark C. Hogrebe & William F. Tate IV - 2010


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 112 Number 4, 2010, p. 1096-1136
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 15661, Date Accessed: 12/7/2021 10:51:05 AM
 
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About the Author
  • Mark Hogrebe
    Washington University in St. Louis
    MARK C. HOGREBE’s position is in Institutional Research, Department of Education, Washington University in St. Louis. He directs the CISTL St. Louis Regional Database Project that compiles data and research about K–12 scientific attainment and other educational indicators. He also serves as the research/statistical analyst for the NSF Math and Science Partnership at Washington University in St. Louis. His interests include research and evaluation methodologies in applied settings and using GIS to give geospatial perspective to educational data. His most recent publication is “Examining Regional Scientific Attainment and School-Teacher Resources Using GIS” (with L. Kyei-Blankson & L. Zou), Education and Urban Society (2008).
  • William Tate IV
    Washington University in St. Louis
    E-mail Author
    WILLIAM F. TATE IV is the Edward Mallinckrodt Distinguished University Professor in Arts & Science at Washington University in St. Louis and director of the Center for the Study of Regional Competitiveness in Science and Technology and CISTL. Tate’s interdisciplinary scholarship concentrates on two main areas: mathematics, science, engineering, and technology attainment, specifically, in metropolitan America, and the social determinates of education and health disparities. Two recent publications include: (1) “Geography of Opportunity”: Poverty, Place, and Educational Outcomes, Educational Researcher (2008); and (2) “The Political Economy of Teacher Quality in School Mathematics: African American Males, Opportunity Structures, Politics, and Method,” American Behavioral Scientist (2008).
 
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