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Read a Post for High Bark, Low Bite: A Perspective on the Possible Impact of the Supreme Court Cleveland Voucher Decision
 
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It's not about sending poor kids to private schools!

Posted By: Warren Norred on July 10, 2002
 
The author doesn't make any outlandish claims, and the 'high' and 'low' impact scenarios certainly cover the full spectrum, so I don't know what we are to get out of the article.

Ms. Fennimore is missing most of the goals of voucher proponents. The idea is not to put poor kids in private schools, but to create new schools. Most private schools are not much better in performance than government schools, but differ mostly only in their ability to control their clientelle.

People seeking a place to send their children will be using their vouchers at mostly new schools in crowded areas, escaping the harsh conditions of urban schools that have been destroyed by idiotic rules put in place by ivory-tower experts on education.

The question remains how the voucher movement will develop. One obvious place that they are already used is in the remote areas of Vermont. If we can get the same kind of implementation across the nation, those remote vouchers will spread from the hinterland into the suburban world, and out from the inner cities. Eventually, the soccer moms will want their children going to one of the local schools that specialize in science/math, foreign languages, or sports.

Most educators don't get it. It is control that parents want, and that is exactly what is denied to them by the current paradigm.
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 How welcome will the children be? by Beatrice S. Fennimore on July 9, 2002
 
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