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Articles
by Robert McClintock - 2016
This paper introduces the human problem of acting justly; it discusses the work that concepts of justice perform in human action; it situates a concept of formative justice relative to other forms of justice (i.e., distributive, retributive, social); and it explores some implications formative justice can have for educational policy and practice.

by Trynke Keuning, Marieke van Geel, Adrie Visscher, Jean-Paul Fox & Nienke Moolenaar - 2016
This study uses a social network perspective to explore how collaboration in 32 elementary schools in the Netherlands takes shape in the interactions among teachers as they engage in a data-based decision making reform project.

by Noli Brazil - 2016
In a review of 42 neighborhood effects studies on youth-related outcomes conducted in the the 1990s, Leventhal and Brooks-Gunn find that only two articles examined neighborhoods and schools simultaneously. This paper updates their reviews, explores why it is important to consider neighborhoods and schools in combination and uses data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health to empirically examine the effects of studying one context but ignoring the other.

by Gregory Palardy, Russell Rumberger & Truman Butler - 2015
This study examines the effects of socioeconomic, racial, and linguistic segregation on cognitive and noncognitive skills in American high schools.

by Christopher Span - 2015
This chapter details how slavery, segregation, and racism impacted the educational experiences of African Americans from the colonial era to the present. It argues that America has yet to be a truly post-slavery and post-segregation society, let alone a post-racial society.

by Edward Buendía & Paul Humbert-Fisk - 2015
This article reports on a mixed method study that examined the interplay of political, fiscal and demographic dynamics that contributed to the split of a large, U.S., suburban school district.

by Jeff Frank - 2015
This article develops the significance of James Baldwin’s thinking for teacher education. In particular, the article develops Baldwin’s thinking on three interrelated themes: white innocence, fear, and love. The article concludes by arguing that Baldwin’s thinking—particularly his thinking on love—should be given more sustained attention by educators, especially teacher educators.

by Lara Perez-Felkner - 2015
This study investigates how underrepresented students experience the social contexts of their schools in relation to their college ambitions, and the particular attributes of schools’ social contexts that might facilitate their transition to four-year colleges.

by David Hansen - 2015
In this article, the author criticizes popular responses to the question of whether education is possible in the world today. He argues that the question of education needs to be kept open in order to ensure the continuation of education itself.

by Ruth Berkowitz , Hagit Glickman , Rami Benbenishty, Elisheva Ben-Artzi , Tal Raz, Nurit Lipshtat & Ron Avi Astor - 2015
This study examines whether school climate compensates, mediates, or moderates the relationship among student and school SES and mathematics test scores from a nationally representative sample of 5th and 8th grade schools in Israel.

by Kristen Pozzoboni - 2015
This chapter highlights the voices and experiences of young people in a rural part of the United States as they examine youth engagement in academic and community life and generate recommendations for policies and practices to prevent youth from becoming disconnected.

by Barbara Condliffe, Melody Boyd & Stefanie DeLuca - 2015
In this article, we use in-depth interviews with 118 low-income urban youth to investigate how family and neighborhood contexts interact with public school choice policies to shape the educational careers of inner-city students.

by Danielle E. Forest, Kasey Garrison & Sue C. Kimmel - 2015
This article explores portrayals of social class in international, translated literature for children. The authors outline a framework for analyzing class in children’s literature and suggest that books with global origins may provide complex and realistic images of issues related to class.

by Curt Adams, Patrick Forsyth , Ellen Dollarhide , Ryan Miskell & Jordan Ware - 2015
This study advances self-regulatory climate as a social resource for student self-regulation and achievement.

by Philip Lee - 2014
This article examines the student activism that led to the Fifth Circuit’s ruling in Dixon v. Alabama State Board of Education (1961). It explores how the students’ civil rights activism was transformed into a fight for students’ rights and analyzes the interplay of this transformation with future civil rights work.

by Nicholas Bowman & Dafina-Lazarus Stewart - 2014
This article explores the extent to which students’ precollege exposure to racial/ethnic difference within schools, neighborhoods, and friendship groups predicts their complex racial attitudes upon entering college.

by Jennifer Vadeboncoeur, Hitaf Kady-Rachid & Bruce Moghtader - 2014
The chapter introduces the volume on the basis of four principles: seeing education holistically as inclusive of diverse learning contexts; recognizing that learning opportunities emerge both in and across contexts; advancing research on learning in ways that enable the study of learning over time and across contexts; and attending to possible futures in the present.

by Deirdre Kelly - 2014
This chapter delineates three models of democracy, noting the role that alternative education plays within each model. Then, from the perspective of the participatory democracy model, I examine various initiatives to foster democracy in alternative learning contexts, drawing relevant examples from the literature to highlight critical issues, tensions, and dilemmas, and lessons learned.

by Bonny Gildin - 2014
This chapter shares a model of afterschool development created by the not-for-profit All Stars Project. Central to the model are self-conscious and collective acts of performing and pretending that help youth living in high poverty, urban areas grow as learners and builders of their lives and their communities.

by Jrène Rahm - 2014
The chapter explores the space–time configuration of youth-voice driven science practices outside of school that are part of an emergent field of study known as informal science education (ISE). Education is an emergent phenomenon grounded in a relational geography of youths’ complex space–time configurations. A focus on youths’ mobilities offers new insights into the manner youth contribute to their own learning and becoming.

by Shirley Heath - 2014
This chapter examines models of youth-based enterprises in which adolescents take leadership in organizational roles, creative design, and community building. Central to this work is the need for both public and private creative input and financing to develop and support learning environments that engage adolescents in extended projects based in science and art that are socially beneficial to local communities.

by Doris Ash - 2014
This chapter focuses on recognizing humor as a powerful resource for visitors from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds who are new to learning contexts, such as museums and aquariums. By using humor, visitors negotiate hybrid learning spaces, as well as gain authority in informal settings.

by Peter Westoby - 2014
This chapter explores the practice framework guiding the practice of workers at Jabiru Community College, a community-based school in Brisbane, Australia. The chapter articulates the findings from a dialogical inquiry begun by the three authors with input from workers and youth. Seven dimensions of the framework being used by workers are described.

by Eduardo Vianna & Anna Stetsenko - 2014
A transformative activist stance is a theoretically grounded model for educational research based on a radically revised theory of human development and learning. Its purpose is to advance a transformative agenda that contributes to the creation of equitable futures for students, especially those from disadvantaged populations. A collaborative project conducted in a group home for youth in foster care provides a dramatic illustration for this approach.

by Shirin Vossoughi & Kris Gutiérrez - 2014
This chapter brings together cultural-historical approaches to human development with interpretive and multi-sited ethnography in order to: (a) develop ethnographic tools that attend to the ways young people learn within and across multiple contexts; (b) draw from and contrast the methodological insights of single and multi-sited ethnography; and (c) glean principles that help constitute a “multi-sited sensibility” appropriate for taking a more expansive approach to learning that advances conceptions of learning as movement.

by Bruce Kimball - 2014
Comprehensive, multi-year mass fundraising campaigns in American higher education began with the Harvard Endowment Fund (HEF) drive, which extended from 1915 to 1925. Based on the first thorough study of the archival records, this essay reveals that the campaign established novel features of university fundraising through contentious negotiations among conflicting groups, prompted the university administration to centralize and control alumni affairs and development efforts for the first time, and, above all, introduced today’s ubiquitous episodic pattern of continuous fundraising, in which mass comprehensive campaigns alternate with discrete solicitations of wealthy donors, whose dominant roles have never changed.

by Susana Muñoz, Michelle Espino & René Antrop-González - 2014
The authors draw from the historical aspects associated with the formation of Freedom Schools during the Civil Rights era and the concept of school as sanctuary to understand the pedagogical and philosophical underpinnings associated with the establishment of Freedom University. The findings demonstrate that Freedom University is a postsecondary space with characteristics resembling a sanctuary school by centering students’ experiences within the curriculum, using Civil Rights history to complicate contemporary anti-immigration sentiments, and enacting transformational resistance by both students and faculty. The authors suggest that, by creating sanctuaries of learning on a postsecondary level, students without documentation are afforded a space to continue their education for the sake of learning but not for a college degree.

by Sevan Terzian & John Rury - 2014
This article examines the Westinghouse Science Talent Search over its first sixteen years. Although the contest’s organizers emphasized its meritocratic quality, the selection process that it employed systematically discriminated against certain students. Ultimately, the Science Talent Search reflected social and cultural forces that shaped the science professions, and may have represented a lost opportunity to make scientific training more meritocratic.

by Clara Muschkin, Elizabeth Glennie & Audrey Beck - 2014
This study analyzes the association between the presence of old for grade and retained peers and the propensity for seventh-graders to engage in deviant behaviors in school. We also examine the propensity of students to receive an out-of-school suspension, one of the more severe consequences for disciplinary infractions. Consistent with peer influence theories of adolescent behavior, we find that students who attend school with many old for grade or retained students are more likely to commit offenses in school and to be suspended. Furthermore, we find that the vulnerability of students to these peer influences on behavior tends to vary by age, gender, race, and retention status.

by Joanna Geller, Bernadette Doykos, Krista Craven, Kimberly Bess & Maury Nation - 2014
Nearly 60 communities nationwide have been awarded Promise Neighborhoods grants from the U.S. Department of Education. This article uses a case example approach to illustrate how variations in trust between and among parents, school staff, and community institutions in one Promise Neighborhood may hinder or facilitate the success of the initiative.

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Book Reviews
by Stephen Reysen & Iva Katzarska-Miller
reviwed by Hany Zayed - 2019

by Xue Lan Rong & Jeremy Hilburn (Eds.)
reviwed by Eliane Rubinstein-Avila - 2019

by Megan M. Holland
reviwed by Christin DePouw - 2019

by Elizabeth McGhee Hassrick, Stephen W. Raudenbush, & Lisa Rosen
reviwed by Gail McEachron - 2019

by Sarah B. Shear, Christina M. Tschida, Elizabeth Bellows, Lisa Brown Buchanan, & Elizabeth E. Saylor
reviwed by Jing Williams - 2019

by Paul H. Mattingly
reviwed by Sarah Zipf & David Guthrie - 2019

by Thomas D. Fallace
reviwed by Ryan Knowles - 2019

by Charles L. Glenn
reviwed by Liz Jackson - 2019

by Geoffrey Scheurman & Ronald W. Evans (Eds.)
reviwed by Charles White - 2019

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