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G. Stanley Hall and the Social Significance of Adolescence


by Robert E. Grinder & Charles E. Strickland - 1963

G. Stanley Hall (1844-1924) earned America's first PhD in psychology, was the father of the child study movement in the United States, the founder of the American Psychological Association, and the author of some 350 papers, articles, and books, including an enormously comprehensive two-volume treatise on the psychology of adolescence. Lecturer at Harvard, Professor at Johns Hopkins, and President of dark University from its inception until his retirement, Hall enjoyed a thoroughly productive professional career. Most of the institutions fathered by him are now nationally prominent, but from its peak at the turn of the century, the influence of his theory and research has ebbed continuously.


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 64 Number 5, 1963, p. 390-390
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 2859, Date Accessed: 10/14/2019 9:54:43 AM

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