Home Articles Reader Opinion Editorial Book Reviews Discussion Writers Guide About TCRecord
transparent 13
Topics
Discussion
Announcements
 

Who Is Watching? What Do They Want? A Foucauldian Analysis of Teacher Candidates’ Experiences With the edTPA


by Meghan A. Kessler, Alexis Jones & Marilyn Johnston-Parsons - 2020

Background/Context: This article is a policy discussion of the edTPA preservice portfolio assessment; it uses Foucault’s work and our data to suggest a more critical and activist approach to the assessment. Currently 764 teacher education programs in 40 states have included the edTPA as part of their requirements. In Illinois, it is a newly required high-stakes portfolio assessment required for teacher licensure.

Purpose/Objective: We studied our teacher candidates’ experiences with edTPA portfolio. We wanted to know how they experienced this new assessment and how that might inform our program. As instructors, we had heard many complaints from our candidates, and we wanted to examine their experiences from their perspectives.

Participants: In this study, we collected narrative accounts from two different cohorts of teacher candidates in Year 1 (2015–16) and Year 3 (2017–18) to better understand their perspectives (total N = 37). The participants were interviewed at the end of their student teaching semester after they had completed their portfolio.

Research Design: We collected narrative accounts from two different cohorts of teacher candidates in Year 1 (2015–16) and Year 3 (2017–18) to better understand their experiences with the edTPA (total N = 37). We gave participants a choice of whether to do individual or focus group narratives. Participants were interviewed at the end of their student teaching semester after they had completed their portfolio.

Findings: As teacher educators, we aimed to support our candidates’ development into critically engaged educators. However, we found that the regulatory powers in the policies and procedures of the edTPA had a negative effect on our candidates’ experiences with it. We also did not give them the tools they needed to sufficiently analyze this particular assessment, despite having discussed testing policies in the schools and their negative implications for teachers and students. Further, we found a normalization of the edTPA between Year 1 and Year 3 of implementing this assessment that suggested a trend toward normalization over time—from energetic critique in Year 1 to acceptance and a just-get-it-done attitude in Year 3.

Conclusions: We conclude with implications for teacher educators, including a call for more critical engagement with this and other disciplinary technologies that our candidates may be subject to. As teacher educators, we advocate for a more explicit critical analysis with candidates to help them more deeply understand the history, context, and implications of corporatized, standardized assessments in teacher education, in particular the edTPA, and testing in the schools.



To view the full-text for this article you must be signed-in with the appropriate membership. Please review your options below:

Sign-in
Email:
Password:
Store a cookie on my computer that will allow me to skip this sign-in in the future.
Send me my password -- I can't remember it
 
Purchase this Article
Purchase Who Is Watching? What Do They Want? A Foucauldian Analysis of Teacher Candidates’ Experiences With the edTPA
Individual-Resource passes allow you to purchase access to resources one resource at a time. There are no recurring fees.
$12
Become a Member
Online Access
With this membership you receive online access to all of TCRecord's content. The introductory rate of $25 is available for a limited time.
$25
Print and Online Access
With this membership you receive the print journal and free online access to all of TCRecord's content.
$210


Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 122 Number 12, 2020, p. -
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 23535, Date Accessed: 3/7/2021 1:27:23 AM

Purchase Reprint Rights for this article or review
 
Article Tools
Related Articles
There are no related articles to display

Related Discussion
 
Post a Comment | Read All

About the Author
  • Meghan A. Kessler
    University of Illinois Springfield
    E-mail Author
    MEGHAN A. KESSLER, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of teacher education at the University of Illinois Springfield. Her research and teaching interests include early career professional learning, preservice teacher evaluation, and social studies teaching and learning. She has recently published "Preparing the Teacher Educator: Negotiating the Tensions of Teacher Educator Preparation Within the Research Institution” in Preparing the Next Generation of Teacher Educators for Clinically-Intensive Teacher Preparation (Yendol-Hoppey, Dana, & Hoppey, Eds.). Before pursuing her PhD, she was a Grades 6–12 social studies teacher.
  • Alexis Jones
    Eastern Illinois University
    E-mail Author
    ALEXIS JONES, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the Department of Teaching, Learning, and Foundations at Eastern Illinois University in Charleston, Illinois. Her research and teaching interests include the moral and ethical experience of teachers, including an ethic of care and teachers’ emotions. With Dr. Kessler, she is a coauthor of the chapter "Preparing the Teacher Educator: Negotiating the Tensions of Teacher Educator Preparation Within the Research Institution” in Preparing the Next Generation of Teacher Educators for Clinically-Intensive Teacher Preparation (Yendol-Hoppey, Dana, & Hoppey, Eds.); and Cronenberg, S., Harrison, D., Korson, S., Jones, A., Murray-Everett, N., Parrish, M., & Johnston-Parsons, M. (2016). “Trouble with the edTPA: Lessons learned from a narrative self-study.” Journal of Inquiry and Action in Education, 8(1), 109–134.
  • Marilyn Johnston-Parsons
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    E-mail Author
    MARILYN JOHNSTON-PARSONS, Ph.D., is emeritus professor in the College of Education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She has long been interested in studying the benefits and burdens of school–university collaboration as well as teacher education and professional development. Two publications are: Johnston-Parsons, M., & PDS Colleagues. (2012). Dialogue and difference in a teacher education program: A 16-year sociocultural study of a PDS. Information Age; and Amalia, Y., Johnson Mardones, D., Shen, W., Shin, Y., Swanson, J. & Johnston-Parsons, M. (2015). Dialogue in narrative inquiry. In P. Smeyers, D. Bridges, N. Burbules, & M. Griffiths (Eds.), International handbook of interpretation in educational research methods (pp. 161–184). SAGE.
 
Member Center
In Print
This Month's Issue

Submit
EMAIL

Twitter

RSS