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Beyond Damage-Centered Teacher Education: Humanizing Pedagogy for Teacher Educators and Preservice Teachers


by Dorinda J. Carter Andrews, Tashal Brown, Bernadette M. Castillo, Davena Jackson & Vivek Vellanki - 2019

Background/Context: In our best efforts to increase preservice teachers’ critical consciousness regarding the historical and contemporary inequities in the P–12 educational system and equip them to embody pedagogies and practices that counter those inequities, teacher educators often provide curricular and field experiences that reinforce the deficit mindsets that students bring to the teacher education classroom. For many social justice-oriented teacher educators, our best intentions to create humanizing experiences for future teachers can have harmful results that negatively impact preservice teachers’ ability to successfully teach culturally diverse students in a multitude of learning contexts.

Purpose/Objective/Research Question/Focus of Study: In this article, we propose a humanizing pedagogy for teacher education that is informed by our experiences as K–12 teachers and teacher educators in a university-based teacher preparation program. We focus on the general questions, How can university-based teacher preparation programs embody and enact a humanizing pedagogy? and What role can curriculum play in advancing a humanizing pedagogy in university-based teacher preparation programs?

Research Design: In this conceptual article, we theorize a humanizing pedagogy for teacher education and propose a process of becoming asset-, equity-, and social justice-oriented teachers. This humanizing pedagogy represents a strengths-based approach to teaching and learning in the teacher preparation classroom.

Conclusions/Recommendations: We propose core tenets of a humanizing pedagogy for teacher education that represent an individual and collective effort toward critical consciousness for preservice teachers and also for teacher educators. If university-based teacher education programs are committed to cultivating the development of asset-, equity-, and social justice-oriented preservice teachers, the commitments to critical self-reflection, resisting binaries, and enacting ontological and epistemological plurality need to be foundational to program structure, curricula alignment, and instructional practice.



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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 121 Number 6, 2019, p. 1-28
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 22737, Date Accessed: 7/23/2019 10:41:19 PM

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About the Author
  • Dorinda Carter Andrews
    Michigan State University
    E-mail Author
    DORINDA J. CARTER ANDREWS is associate dean for equity and inclusion and associate professor of teacher education at Michigan State University. Her research broadly focuses on issues of racial equity and justice in teacher education and P–21 educational contexts. She uses qualitative methodologies and critical frameworks to examine race and racism in schools, urban teacher preparation, and Black education.
  • Tashal Brown
    Michigan State University
    E-mail Author
    TASHAL BROWN is a doctoral student in curriculum, instruction and teacher education at Michigan State University. She is a former middle and high school teacher. Her research interests focus on critical civic literacies, Black feminist epistemologies, and interrogations of power and identity within the teacher education and K–12 classrooms.
  • Bernadette Castillo
    Minnesota State University, Mankato
    E-mail Author
    BERNADETTE M. CASTILLO is an assistant professor of Educational Studies: K–12 & Secondary Programs at Minnesota State University, Mankato. She is a former classroom teacher and administrator. Her research focuses on culturally responsive practices in P–12 educational contexts.
  • Davena Jackson
    Michigan State University
    E-mail Author
    DAVENA JACKSON is a doctoral candidate in curriculum, instruction and teacher education at Michigan State University. Her research focuses on critical examinations of racial literacy, race, racism, and anti-Blackness among teachers and students within teaching and English education. Davena is a former middle and high school English teacher.
  • Vivek Vellanki
    Michigan State University
    E-mail Author
    VIVEK VELLANKI is a doctoral student in curriculum, instruction and teacher education at Michigan State University. His research interests are at the nexus of youth identity, visual methodologies, and globalization.
 
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