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Does Teacher Education Matter?


by Keffrelyn D. Brown & Anthony L. Brown - 2019

This commentary takes up the question, "Does teacher education matter?" and points to the necessity of centering sociocultural considerations when doing teacher education, equitably and in a just way.


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This commentary is part of the upcoming June special issue of Teachers College Record on “Transforming University-Based Teacher Education," edited by Mariana Souto-Manning and Thomas Philip.


Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 121 Number 6, 2019, p. 1-4
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 22685, Date Accessed: 10/20/2019 10:35:50 AM

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    About the Author
    • Keffrelyn Brown
      The University of Texas at Austin
      E-mail Author
      KEFFRELYN D. BROWN is Professor of Cultural Studies in Education and African and African Diaspora Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Her research examines (1) the sociocultural knowledge of race in teaching, curriculum and teacher education, and (2) discourses and practices that shape Black intellectual thought and education.
    • Anthony Brown
      The University of Texas at Austin
      E-mail Author
      ANTHONY L. BROWN is Professor of Social Studies Education and African and African Diaspora Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. His research explores (1) how education stakeholders understand and respond to Black male students and (2) how official and popular curricula depict the historical experiences of Black Americans.
     
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