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The Meaning of Propaganda


by C.H. Van Duzer - 1938

A PARADOX of the scientific twentieth century is the recrudescence of a kind of medieval realism in our ways of thinking. We live beguiled, cajoled, frightened, controlled by general terms (universals), which we are prone to accept as realities with definite, predetermined meanings universally agreed upon. As the medieval realist appealed and reacted to such terms as the Trinity, the Atonement, the City of God, so the modern public appeals and reacts to Liberty, System of Free Enterprise, Americanism, the American Way of Life, Democracy, and the like. Our conduct appears in large part controlled by symbols, verbal formulas and stereotypes, and by those experts who employ such as their tools of trade, i.e., the propagandists.


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 1 Number 1, 1938, p. 245-248
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 13725, Date Accessed: 9/29/2020 1:34:40 PM

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  • C.H. Van Duzer


 
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