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The Hardest Deal of All: The Battle Over School Integration in Mississippi, 1870-1980


reviewed by Marilyn D.S. Monteiro - January 12, 2006

coverTitle: The Hardest Deal of All: The Battle Over School Integration in Mississippi, 1870-1980
Author(s): Charles C. Bolton
Publisher: University Press of Mississippi, Jackson
ISBN: 1578067170, Pages: 278, Year: 2005
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Segregated schools defined white’s relational status to blacks in Mississippi.  Without segregated schooling to aid in maintaining white supremacy, whites saw themselves as being no better than the blacks they feared and despised. It was necessary, therefore, that blacks be kept powerless—socially, politically, and economically.  And poor schooling would certainly help to insure this outcome.   Following Reconstruction, black children were forced to attend separate facilities in Mississippi, which, until the late 1970’s, were largely established through their own endeavors. But lacking sufficient resources these schools were mostly one-room operations or poorly housed facilities funded by private philanthropy—often with strings attached—or, later, inadequate public school facilities which school officials grudgingly and barely funded. All, more often than not, were woefully deficient compared with the schools and the school-related resources provided white children. Black parents desired to improve the quality of schooling for their children and sought access to white, better-funded schools. But... (preview truncated at 150 words.)


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record, Date Published: January 12, 2006
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 12289, Date Accessed: 11/15/2019 6:03:40 AM

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About the Author
  • Marilyn Monteiro
    Massachusetts Initiative for New Teachers
    E-mail Author
    MARILYN D. S. MONTEIRO is state coordinator of the Massachusetts Initiative for New Teachers. Her areas of interests focus on school desegregation, affirmative action, multicultural education, teacher preparation, and adult literacy. She is currently working on evaluating accelerated teacher preparation programs in Massachusetts.
 
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