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Handwriting. Part I. The Measurement of the Quality of Handwriting: The Nature of the Scale, including Qualities or Degrees of Merit from that of Copy-book Models down


by Edward L. Thorndike - 1910

Pages 11 to 37 contain or rather are the scale for merit of the handwriting of children of grades 5 to 8. It is not a scale of merit of the writings of children of grades I to 4 or of the writings of boys and girls of the high-school age. It can, however, be more or less well used for such cases until we get more appropriate scales. Each set of samples represents a point on this scale. The samples on page n are of quality 18 and 17; the samples on page 13 are of quality 16; the samples on pages 15 and 17 are of quality 15; and so on. The use of 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17 for these qualities of handwriting means, first of all, that 14 is as much better than 13, as 13 is than 12; that 13 is as much better than 12, as 12 is than n, and so on. In the second place it means that quality 14 is two times as far above o merit in handwriting as quality 7 is; that quality 16 is twice as far above o merit in handwriting as quality 8 is, and so on. Zero merit is defined roughly as writing as bad as sample 140 (see page 45), as a handwriting, recognizable as such, but of absolutely no merit as handwriting. The use of several samples under one quality means that those samples are of equal merit. The scale includes samples of as many different styles as could be obtained, so that in using the scale the merit of any sample of any style of writing can be quickly ascertained by comparison with the scale. The scale extends in actual samples by children from nearly the worst writingi of fourth-grade children (quality 5) to nearly the best writing of eighth-grade children (quality 17). Quality 7 is nearly the worst writing of fifth-grade children.


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 11 Number 2, 1910, p. 7-8
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 10062, Date Accessed: 6/1/2020 1:34:49 AM

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  • Edward Thorndike


 
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