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Microcomputers in Education: Why Is Earlier Better?


by Harriet K. Cuffaro 1984

Intrinsic to my perspective as an early childhood educator is the emphasis given to an organic, developmental view of children and their particular learning styles. This view serves as the context for the discussion that follows and is the link that thematically connects the topics to be discussed: an examination of the different types of programming activities and the variety of software available for these young ages.


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 85 Number 4, 1984, p. 559-568
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 872, Date Accessed: 12/10/2017 9:00:30 PM

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About the Author
  • Harriet Cuffaro
    Bank Street College of Education
    HARRIET K. CUFFARO is a member of the graduate faculty at Bank Street College of Education where she teaches courses, supervises teachers, and coordinates an intern program. As a curriculum specialist, she has contributed to the development of non-sexist and multicultural programs and materials. Her publications reflect her interest in issues of equity and young children's dramatic play and block building. She currently holds a John Dewey Senior Research Fellowship from the Center for Dewey Studies.
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