Home Articles Reader Opinion Editorial Book Reviews Discussion Writers Guide About TCRecord
transparent 13
Topics
Discussion
Announcements
 

New Studies in Education: A Study of Some Problems Arising in the Admission of Students as Candidates for Professional Degrees in Education


by Clarence Linton - 1927

IT IS the purpose of this study:1 (1) to state the major problems arising in the admission of students as candidates for professional degrees in education; (2) to present the more significant data obtained from a survey of current practice in admitting students to work in education in institutions authorized to grant degrees; (3) to indicate the need of definite educational principles as a basis for policies governing the admission of students to professional work in education; (4) to make recommendations relative to the procedure of officials responsible for the admission of students to professional work in education.

IT IS the purpose of this study:1 (1) to state the major problems arising in the admission of students as candidates for professional degrees in education; (2) to present the more significant data obtained from a survey of current practice in admitting students to work in education in institutions authorized to grant degrees; (3) to indicate the need of definite educational principles as a basis for policies governing the admission of students to professional work in education; (4) to make recommendations relative to the procedure of officials responsible for the admission of students to professional work in education.

PROCEDURE AND SOURCES OF DATA


A questionnaire was sent to each of the 685 institutions listed in the Educational Directory of the United States Bureau of Education for 1926 as granting a degree and as having a department or school of education, or as offering a major in education, concerning the current practice of these institutions in admitting students to (l) an undergraduate program in education, (a) without advanced standing, (b) with advanced standing; (2) a graduate program of studies in education.

The data obtained from the questionnaire have been tabulated for four groups of institutions: liberal arts colleges, teachers colleges, publicly supported universities and colleges, and privately supported universities.

CONCLUSIONS


1. Current practice in admitting students to candidacy for professional degrees in education is not governed by generally accepted educational principles or rules of procedure.


2. Relatively little attempt has been made to obtain general agreement with respect to admission policies.


3. The variation of practice in admission procedure is much greater within the groups of institutions than among the different groups.


4. Slight attention has been given the problems of admission in teacher training institutions from a strictly professional point of view.


5. Too much emphasis has been placed upon factors of secondary importance, while primary considerations have been neglected.


6. The voluminous literature which exists on the articulation of secondary schools and colleges stands in marked contrast to the one brief study which has been made on the admission of students with advanced standing as candidates for the Bachelor's degree, and the meager literature which exists relative to admission to graduate work.

RECOMMENDATIONS


The following fundamental considerations are offered as a basis for specific recommendations which look toward bringing about a more desirable practice:


1. The admission policies of teacher training institutions should be based on general principles or rules of procedure which are applicable to the admission policies of schools preparing for admission to any profession.


2. Admission policies should be based on as full knowledge as possible of what constitutes optimum professional preparation at all levels of the profession.


3. The policies governing the admission of students to teacher training institutions should take into account the nature of the profession of teaching itself, its historical background, its limitations, and its possible developments, and should be consistent with the philosophy of education which professional schools of education represent.


4. Admission policies should take into account as a primary consideration the personal fitness of the applicant for service in some field of education, while considerations pertaining to the institution

from which he comes should be secondary.


5. Admission policies should recognize and accept responsibility for the educational guidance of the student from his induction into the institution.


6. The admission policies of an institution should be formulated by the most able members of the faculty in the light of fundamental knowledge and definitely stated principles, and should be executed by an admissions official of academic rank who is conversant with the policies of the institution and who is privileged to sit in all conferences when such policies are under consideration. His procedure should be subject to the approval of a committee of the faculty.







1 By Clarence Linton, Ph.D. Teachers College, Columbia University, Contributions to Education, No, 285.



Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 29 Number 2, 1927, p. 165-166
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 5806, Date Accessed: 5/21/2022 5:43:44 AM

Purchase Reprint Rights for this article or review
 
 
Member Center
In Print
This Month's Issue

Submit
EMAIL

Twitter

RSS