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Doctor of Education Project Reports: Socio-economics for Australian Secondary Schools: A Guide for Teachers


by Max W. Poulier - 1951

The main objective of this project is to give the adolescent those basic experiences and insights into his culture, which will enable him to be a happier person, a better worker, and a more alert consumer.

In every society there are certain human needs that must be satisfied in order for men to live happily, and certain social demands that man must meet in order that the group may function smoothly.1


Examples of these universal needs are: language, recognition of the individual by the group, aesthetic satisfaction, family life, satisfactory explanation of natural phenomena. Examples of social demands put upon the individual are: recognition and acceptance of his role within the family and larger social group, respect for the customs with regard to food, shelter, clothing, property, and respect for the law.


The main objective of this project is to give the adolescent those basic experiences and insights into his culture, which will enable him to be a happier person, a better worker, and a more alert consumer.


This is a revolt against the static economics curriculum which teaches generalized concepts rarely understood by the students.


The study is an integration of descriptive economics, consumer economics, business principles, bookkeeping for everyday life, commercial law, social studies, and civics designed for use in Australian secondary schools.


There are four parts of the study: (1) Background; (2) Utilization of Government Services; (3) Consumer Education; and (4) General Topics — such as advertising, personal record keeping, bookkeeping for farmers and clubs, cooperatives, everyday law, and trade unions.


The value of the study will be determined largely by the way in which the questions and suggestions at the end of each chapter are used. The introduction deals at some length with a suggested methodology.


The material of this study is to be regarded as the starting point for unending classroom discussion, for wide library reading, many community visits, interviews with authorities and specialists, lecturettes to the class, school projects, and incessant asking of questions — all in the pursuit of knowledge which may be applied to everyday living.






1 The manuscripts of the Doctor of Education Project Reports reviewed in The Record are on file in the Library of Teachers College, Columbia University.



Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 52 Number 6, 1951, p. 387-388
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 5194, Date Accessed: 5/20/2022 12:38:13 AM

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