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When the Tears Just Pop Out of Your Eyes: Reconfiguring Social-Classed Literacies through a Posthuman Teacher Education Pedagogy


by Stephanie Jones, Breanne Huston & Karen Spector - 2019

This chapter draws on theories of new materialisms that assume the discursive (language, ideology, emotions) and the material (physical space, material objects, bodies) are always entangled and act together to produce phenomena. We use these theoretical concepts to persuade readers that the ways we perceive, judge, and discriminate based on social-class difference are literacies that we acquire and produce across time and space. The authors argue that these literacies are acquired by the body through our material-discursive intra-actions and are often felt viscerally, even when we don’t have access to language appropriate for articulating what we know. We use vignettes from teacher education courses to support a call for tending to the body, space, social-classed texts, and emotions in the design of curriculum and pedagogy aimed at approaches to teaching and learning that are sensitive to social class.


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 121 Number 13, 2019, p. -
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 23004, Date Accessed: 11/14/2019 11:35:00 PM

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About the Author
  • Stephanie Jones
    University of Georgia
    E-mail Author
    STEPHANIE JONES is a Josiah Meigs Distinguished Teaching Professor at the University of Georgia who likes thinking about how people teach and learn and what material and psychosocial conditions prompt certain ways of doing and being. Her research often intersects with issues of gender, social class, race, place, literacies, and pedagogy. She is concerned about equity and the opportunities people have or don’t have to expand and change in ways they find inspiring and fulfilling. On Mutant Pedagogies: Seeking Justice and Drawing Change in Teacher Education (with James F. Woglom) is her latest book.
  • Breanne Huston
    University of Georgia
    E-mail Author
    BREANNE HUSTON is a former English teacher and instructional coach who currently serves as the Secondary English Language Arts & Literacy Program Specialist for the Georgia Department of Education. She is a PhD candidate at the University of Georgia, where she also serves as a co-director for the Red Clay Writing Project.
  • Karen Spector
    University of Alabama
    E-mail Author
    KAREN SPECTOR is Associate Professor of English Education and Literacy at the University of Alabama. She inquires about what is produced through entanglements with difficult knowledge—including both everyday and extraordinary encounters with racism, classism, fascism, and homophobia—and studies the literatures that bring these issues into both the classrooms and out-of-school pedagogical spaces. Her work has been published in journals, and she recently co-edited Posthumanism and Literacy Education (Routledge).
 
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