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Liked Your Textbook. . . But Iíll Never Use it in the Courses I Teach


by Angus McMurtry - August 03, 2015

This commentary is an actual email letter from an education faculty professor to an educational textbook sales representative. In it, the Professor explains why he will not use a textbook that is based on the popular, but unexamined assumption that learning is about individual brains acquiring information. Instead, he uses numerous practical examples, sarcasm, and a strong dose of idealism to argue for a view of learning that engages with the realities of embodiment, individual subjectivity, social participation, cultural context, and biological diversity. To bolster his argument, the professor draws upon Piaget, Vygotsky constructivist theory, and a relational view of epistemology that transcends both objectivism and subjectivism.


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record, Date Published: August 03, 2015
https://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 18058, Date Accessed: 12/10/2019 5:51:59 PM

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