Home Articles Reader Opinion Editorial Book Reviews Discussion Writers Guide About TCRecord
transparent 13
Topics
Discussion
Announcements

John Dewey Speaks to Brown: Research, Democratic Social Movement Strategies, and the Struggle for Education on Equal Terms


by John Rogers & Jeannie Oakes — 2005

This article explores how a revitalized public life promises to be far more effective than conventional school reform in bringing more equitable education policy. Participatory social inquiry stands in contrasts to the limited and mostly technical focus of equity reforms that began with Great Society policies in the 1960s and 1970s and that continues today. These equity reforms have largely failed to account for the deeply held and pervasive cultural norms about race, merit, and schooling that sustain inequality. The authors find an alternative model for equity reform in John Dewey's later work. Engaging citizens in Deweyan-inspired public social inquiry can yield knowledge that defines high-quality education, merit, and achievement in racially inclusive ways. By participating in social inquiry, low-income parents and parents of color have the opportunity to remake their image, becoming actors in an organizing "movement" context. Their engagement helps frame a powerful story of parents and communities who want and deserve high-quality education and who know what education can and should be. As such stories take hold in the public consciousness, cultural obstacles to equity can be challenged more successfully, thereby advancing Brown's promise of education on equal terms.


To view the full-text for this article you must be signed-in with the appropropriate membership. Please review your options below:

Sign-in
Email:
Password:
Store a cookie on my computer that will allow me to skip this sign-in in the future.
Send me my password -- I can't remember it
 
Purchase this Article
Purchase John Dewey Speaks to Brown: Research, Democratic Social Movement Strategies, and the Struggle for Education on Equal Terms
Individual-Resource passes allow you to purchase access to resources one resource at a time. There are no recurring fees.
$12
Become a Member
Online Access
With this membership you receive online access to all of TCRecord's content. The introductory rate of $25 is available for a limited time.
$25
Print and Online Access
With this membership you receive the print journal and free online access to all of TCRecord's content.
$210


Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 107 Number 9, 2005, p. 2178-2203
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 12157, Date Accessed: 10/22/2017 7:03:12 PM

Purchase Reprint Rights for this article or review
Article Tools
Related Articles

Related Discussion
 
Post a Comment | Read All

About the Author
  • John Rogers
    UCLA Institute for Democracy, Education, and Access
    E-mail Author
    JOHN ROGERS is the associate director of UCLA’s Institute for Democracy, Education & Access (IDEA) and the founding editor of Teaching to Change LA, an online journal. He studies strategies for engaging urban youth, community members, and teachers as public intellectuals seeking to make schools places of equal opportunity and democratic life. Recent publications include ‘‘Creating a Public Accountability for California Schools’’ in Teachers College Record (2004) and ‘‘Accountability for Adequate and Equitable Opportunities to Learn’’ in Kenneth Sirotnik (Ed.), Holding Accountability Accountable: What Ought to Matter in Public Education (New York: Teachers College Press, 2004) with J. Oakes and G. Blasi.
  • Jeannie Oakes
    UCLA Institute for Democracy, Education, and Access
    E-mail Author
    JEANNIE OAKES is Presidential Professor in Educational Equity and Director of UCLA’s Institute for Democracy, Education & Access (IDEA) and UC’s All Campus Consortium on Research for Diversity (ACCORD). Her research focuses on schooling inequalities and the struggle for more socially just schools. Her most recent book is a new edition of Keeping Track: How Schools Structure Inequality (Yale University Press, 2005).
Member Center
In Print
This Month's Issue

Submit
EMAIL

Twitter

RSS