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by Jemimah Young & Ramon Goings — 2018
This introduction provides an overview of the Every Child Succeeds Act (ESSA) theme of this yearbook.

by Floyd Beachum — 2018
This analysis seeks to explain the purpose of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) and outline the current plight of many students of color in the United States. It then uses critical race to contextualize and categorize persistent problems that face the implementation of ESSA for these students of color.

by Donald Easton-Brooks, Derrick Robinson & Sheneka Williams — 2018
In the midst of parts of ESSA promoting a more diverse educator workforce, the article takes a look that the challenges facing schools at the teacher and leadership level as many school districts make the transitions of engaging in a more diverse environment at the student, teacher, and leadership level.

by Michelle Salazar Pérez — 2018
In light of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), the newest iteration of NCLB, this article first traces the history of NCLB’s influence on early childhood education and care. New and modified aspects of ESSA are then examined. With unprecedented emphasis on young children, this article discusses the potential impacts of ESSA on early childhood education for years to come.

by Dorothy Hines, Robb King Jr. & Donna Ford — 2018
In this article, we examine the disciplinary experiences of Black students with and without dis/abilities, and the role of the Every Student Succeeds Act (2015) in addressing racial and gender disparities in punishments. Using national data and an equity formula, we determine the percentage of inequitable overrepresentation of Black girls and Black boys for in-school and out-of-school suspensions.

by Larry Walker — 2018
Policy makers have to ensure that federal programs align with the needs of underserved communities. For this reason, this article examines the impact that the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) could have on African American students’ access to mental health support services in PreK–12 schools.

by Jamaal Young, Mary Capraro, Robert Capraro & Marti Cason — 2018
This article focuses on the Every Student Succeeds Act, which stipulates numerous provisions for supporting science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). We reviewed the provisions in five areas pertinent to STEM and based on these presented recommendations to support access, equity, and achievement in STEM content areas.

by Venus Evans-Winters, Dorothy Hines, Allania Moore & Teresa Jones — 2018
Drawing from critical race feminism, this articlechapter discusses how Black girls in the Pk–-12 public school system are disregarded and made invisible within educational policy discourse, implementation, and school reform. We analyze educational policies, including the Every Student Succeeds Act (2015), and suggest that the continued failure of legislation to address the intersectional identities of Black girls contributes to racial and gender disparities in school discipline.

by Keisha Allen, Julius Davis, Renee Garraway & Janeula Burt — 2018
This article examines the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) and its implications for educational equity for Black boys. Using critical race theory, the authors argue that, similar to past policies, ESSA intends to ensure educational equity for all students but ignores the ways in which race, gender, and other forms of oppression are implicated in the teaching and learning process and constrain Black male youths’ opportunities to learn.

by Mike Rose — 2018
This article is an appeal born out of my writing and teaching experience for a publicly engaged education scholarship.

by D. Brent Edwards Jr. & Stephanie Hall — 2018
This article sheds light on teacher management and strategies for resource acquisition within charter schools, based on a case study of the “concession schools” charter school program in Bogotá, Colombia. The study shows that while charter school teachers in Bogotá feel that many aspects of their work environment are positive, charter schools use the flexibility afforded to them around employment to spend half as much on teachers, though these schools simultaneously employ a range of strategies to access additional resources for other aspects of the education they provide.

by Xueli Wang, Kelly Wickersham, Yen Lee & Hsun-Yu Chan — 2018
This study examines community college student success through the lens of social capital, including the role of age in shaping the sources and influences of social capital.

by Ethan Ris — 2018
Between 1895 and 1920, a cohort of business, philanthropic, and academic leaders wielding tremendous wealth and power sought to reshape the form and function of American higher education. Their efforts were largely unsuccessful, but studying them helps us understand the recurrent impulse to reform America’s colleges and universities.

by Benjamin Superfine & David Woo — 2018
This study examines the intersection of the public/private distinction in U.S. law and policy, and the shifting political positions of teacher unions and charter school proponents, in courts and agencies. In addition to examining the history of the public/private distinction in U.S. law and policy and specifically in education, this study includes an in-depth analysis of three recent decisions involving charter schools and teacher unions in which courts and agencies determined whether charter schools were public or private organizations.

by Amy Hutchison & Lindsay Woodward — 2018
This study explored how a yearlong professional development model guided by the Technology Integration Planning Cycle supported teachers’ technology integration efforts. Teachers’ progress as well as student performance are discussed.

by Maria Lewis — 2018
This article examines the implementation of a provision of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act that relates to student discipline.

by Eleanor Craft & Aimee Howley — 2018
This qualitative interview study explored how nine African American students in secondary-level special education placements perceived their school experiences and the benefits, challenges, and detriments associated with their placements and accompanying disability labels. Two themes emerged from data analysis: (1) “students’ journeys from general education to special education had three predictable milestones” and (2) “special education was a dead end.”

by Brady Jones — 2018
This article explores the role of personality in teacher retention using a rich set of quantitative and qualitative measures. The author finds that despite stereotypes of American teachers as unambitious, a “special kind of ambition”—self-promotion coupled with a commitment to others—predicts a long-term commitment to the occupation.

by Alex Kumi-Yeboah — 2018
This study examines the factors that helped Ghanaian-born immigrant students to strategize how to combine their multiple worlds of families, schools, teachers, and peers to affect academic engagement within contexts of school and classroom situations. It also explored teachers’ perception and understanding of the sociocultural and past educational experiences of immigrant students from Ghana.

by Leslie R. Zenk & Karen Seashore Louis — 2018
This paper extends the perspective that institutional missions serve many purposes within universities, and suggests a broader set of functions for missions at master’s- granting institutions that are revealed through metaphor.

by Beth Herbel-Eisenmann, Lindsay Keazer & Anne Traynor — 2018
In this article we explore equity issues related to school district decision-making about students’ opportunities to learn algebra through analysis of a large-scale survey. We examine the extent to which district decision-makers for mathematics attend to aspects of equity when they make decisions about resources related to the teaching and learning of algebra.

by Jason Huff, Courtney Preston, Ellen Goldring & J. Edward Guthrie — 2018
We ask the question: What distinguishes leaders’ practices in more effective high schools from those in less effective high schools that serve large proportions of at-risk youth? We identified a total of four more and less effective high schools using value-added scores (two of each), and we then analyzed interview, observational, and survey data collected in the schools to compare and contrast how leaders support key practices and organizational routines by their staff.

by Saskias Casanova, Keon M. McGuire & Margary Martin — 2018
This paper provides findings from a study that examined students’ immediate responses to microaggressions observed in three community colleges. Our findings show how microaggressions and student responses contribute to and undermine students’ learning experiences.

by Karen Brennan, Sarah Blum-Smith & Maxwell Yurkofsky — 2018
This study examines Massive Open Online Courses as a medium for supporting teacher professional learning. The authors present qualities that teachers found meaningful in an online learning experience, offering heuristics that designers might consider when designing for their specific contexts.

by Amy Stornaiuolo & T. Philip Nichols — 2018
In order to examine the opportunities and challenges of integrating makerspaces into schools, this article focuses on how a new urban public high school created a media production lab to put making practices at the center of teaching and learning. Findings from the study reveal that while the media makerspace helped some students develop, expand, and mobilize audiences and resources using new tools and networks, the making practices of the lab sat in uneasy alignment with the institutional arrangements of school, particularly for students who have been historically marginalized, disenfranchised, or alienated in schools.

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