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by Alyssa Hadley Dunn - 2020
This research investigates the experiences of educators in one metropolitan high school over the course of one school year. In particular, the research questions include: (1) How is the morale of exceptional urban teachers affected by the contextual factors of a neoliberal school climate? (2) How does their morale relate to teachers’ reports of their pedagogy? Findings share how teachers were making sense of a climate that felt like a “sinking ship” over which they had no control and how a “vicious cycle of disempowerment” influenced the way they believed they were performing in the classroom.

by Manka Varghese & Ronald Fuentes - 2020
This study examines why and how some emergent-bilingual students can successfully navigate their environments in order to apply for, get into, and complete a selective four-year college.

by Ryan Crowley & William Smith - 2020
In this conceptual article, the authors demonstrate how the tenets of White privilege pedagogy conflict with key principles of critical race theory and with important lessons from U.S. racial history.

by J. Anglum, Laura Desimone & Kirsten Hill - 2020
This study analyzes the implementation of a blended learning middle school mathematics intervention in a large urban school district in the northeastern United States. The study examines how teachers integrate blended learning strategies into their pedagogical practices and what factors, including school, teacher, and student attributes, facilitate or hinder these approaches.

by Ellen Mandinach, Ryan Miskell & Edith Gummer - 2020
This article examines the information parents want and need to make informed decisions about their child’s education. The article also examines the characteristics of websites and graphical displays that parents prefer to make the information accessible and understandable.

by Stephanie Zuilkowski, Benjamin Piper & Salome Ong’ele - 2020
This study used primary grade students’ gain scores in English and Kiswahili literacy as well as mathematics to examine whether Nairobi students attending low-cost private schools learned more than students attending government schools. The study also examined whether the gains in low-cost private schools and government schools differed within an intensive pedagogical intervention.

by Adam Edgerton, Douglas Fuchs & Lynn Fuchs - 2020
This paper reports on significant developments in the implementation of college- and career-readiness (CCR) standards using representative survey data across three states as they pertain to students with disabilities (SWD), highlighting significantly different policy attitudes among teachers, principals, and district administrators.

by Justin Ortagus, Dennis Kramer, Manuel González Canché & Frank Fernandez - 2020
This study presents a quantitative quasi-experimental case study of the effect of community college baccalaureate (CCB) adoption on associate degree production. When comparing adopting and non-adopting community colleges within the state of Florida, the authors find that the adoption of CCB degree programs has a positive impact on overall associate degree production, but this impact varies considerably according to the type of academic degree program.

by Mary Louise Gomez & Amy Lachuk - 2019
In this chapter, we interrogate how emotions are experienced by prospective and practicing teachers and how they influence our fashioning of identities, as well as our effectiveness; our relationships with students and families; and the curricula, pedagogies, and assessments we employ.

by Mary Louise Gomez & Amy Lachuk - 2019
We explore how contemporary teacher education programs have addressed emotional struggles that prospective and new teachers undergo, as well as successes and criticisms that have been realized in these programs.

by Joanne Carney, Marilyn Chu, Jennifer Green, William Nutting, Susan Donnelly, Andrea Clancy, Marsha Buly & David Carroll - 2019
Achieving educational social justice requires teachers, administrators, teacher education programs, and community organizations to work together to meet the needs of students and their families as teachers—both novice and experienced—develop the skills and dispositions to teach all children. This case study uses mixed-methods research to analyze how one school-university partnership navigated the challenges inherent in such collaborative work.

by John Traynor & Deborah Tully - 2019
Using a mixed-method research design, this case study explores the impact of a six-year partnership between a public K–6 school and two private institutions of higher education. In this article, the partners describe the activities and progress toward stated goals over the life span of the partnership (2012–2018).

by Kate Napolitan, John Traynor, Deborah Tully, Joanne Carney, Susan Donnelly & Leslie Herrenkohl - 2019
This article describes how four teacher education programs took up a legislative initiative to better partner with local schools, families, and communities. It illustrates the impacts that these collaborations had on preservice teachers.

by Todd Herrenkohl & Leslie Herrenkohl - 2019
In an attempt to explore innovative models to improve student achievement, close the opportunity gap, and deepen the knowledge and skills of current and future educators, the Washington State Legislature passed a bill in 2012 that created a pilot project called Collaborative Schools for Innovation and Success (CSIS). This introduction describes the processes followed by the site teams as they prepared and then implemented their school improvement goals. It also highlights several broad contributions of the CSIS effort and introduces the articles of the special issue.

by David Phelps - 2019
The research–practice gap is an enduring problem in the field of education. The gap refers to educational research that is not practice informed, and educational practice that is not research informed. A popular approach to bridge the research–practice gap in education is to build partnerships between schools and universities that are active within the context of a school setting (rather than exclusively in a laboratory school or through college courses).

by Leslie Herrenkohl, Kate Napolitan, Todd Herrenkohl, Elham Kazemi, Logan McAuley & David Phelps - 2019
Washington State’s grant for school–university partnerships provided a large research university and Blakeview Elementary School (pseudonym) an opportunity to engage in a shared visioning process that led to establishing a full-service community school. This article presents a case study of work that was conducted across five years: a planning year and four years of implementation.

by Paul Eaton & Petra Hendry - 2019
This article provides an analysis of the dominant narratives of educational history in which curriculum has been constructed as a reductionist, linear input-output closed system of knowledge production. Drawing on Deleuze and Guatarri’s concept of assemblage the authors engage the new materialism to revision curriculum as an ontological endeavor of being~becoming.

by Sam Wineburg & Sarah McGrew - 2019
This study compares how professional fact checkers, historians, and first year college students evaluated online information and presents the strategies fact checkers used to efficiently and effectively find trustworthy information.

by Melissa Martinez, Isaac Torres & Katherine Lewis - 2019
This three-year, multi-site case study examined the college-going messaging at three racially and economically diverse public high schools in different regions of Texas. Findings suggest the need to: reconsider what a strong college-going culture entails, re-envision college-going cultures as dynamic, multi-layered, and responsive, reframe postsecondary opportunities so they are more expansive and varied, and re-evaluate inequities in college-going messaging and academic rigor.

by Kathryn Strom, Jason Margolis & Nihat Polat - 2019
The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, we aim to problematize the construct of “teacher dispositions” through a critical synthesis of literature and a discussion of a rhizomatic perspective to generate a (re)conceptualization that is more closely aligned with the immensely complex nature of teaching and learning. Second, we draw on samples of university-generated teacher disposition assessment tools to provide concrete examples that “put to work” this rethinking of dispositions, and which demonstrates that the field may be showing signs of moving toward a more contextual understanding of the construct.

by Jennifer Darling-Aduana, Annalee Good & Carolyn Heinrich - 2019
We investigate and identify disparate access to quality educational experiences in online credit-recovery labs, which mirror those documented by others in traditional instructional settings based on class-based expectations. Based on our analysis, we propose strategies to support more equitable learning in online courses including providing explicit expectations and proactive assistance to students, using real-time data by teachers, accommodating lower student-teacher ratios, and assigning to online labs teachers certified in the course subjects in which students enroll.

by Elizabeth Minor, Guan Saw, Kenneth Frank, Barbara Schneider & Kaitlin Torphy - 2019
Using eight years of state longitudinal data on Michigan public high schools’ teachers, this study finds that school level teacher turnover rates were significantly higher during the recession and following the announcement of a state mandated curricular change. However, the relationship between these external contextual factors and school level teacher turnover rates depend on the locale of the school with magnitudes of the increases in teacher turnover being the highest for schools in towns and lowest for city schools.

by Christopher Redding & Thomas Smith - 2019
This study uses discrete time survival analysis to analyze when early career teachers turn over and the extent to which in-service induction supports are linked with greater retention among alternatively certified teachers.

by Ann Ishimaru, Joe Lott, II, Kathryn Torres & Karen O’Reilly-Diaz - 2019
Beyond deficit-based approaches to involving parents, a growing body of work has begun to re-envision how nondominant families might become powerful partners in equity-based educational change. The present study contributes to this literature by identifying how—through key turning points marked by critical discursive shifts—the co-design of a parent curriculum cultivated the collective transformative agency of nondominant families to more equitably collaborate with formal educators in changemaking work.

by Lois Weis, Margaret Eisenhart, Greg Duncan, Elizabeth Albro, Andrea Conklin Bueschel, Paul Cobb, Jacquelynne Eccles, Ruby Mendenhall, Pamela Moss, William Penuel, Robert Ream, Rubén Rumbaut, Finbarr Sloane, Thomas Weisner & James Wilson - 2019
This special report of the Mixed Methods Working Group is edited by Lois Weis, Margaret Eisenhart, and Greg J. Duncan.

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