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Volume 114, Number 13 (2012)

 
by Patrick K. Schmidt & Cathy Benedict
More than 75 years after the 1936 Yearbook was published, a globalized society continues to advance the not-always-equal exchange of social, cultural, and economic markers. Music is not only an integral element in such exchanges—as a commodity and a set of practices—but also central to discussions about education within and outside schooling
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by Richard Colwell
Music has pervaded American history since the founding fathers sang hymns aboard the Mayflower. From that time until the present, music has been so embedded in U.S. society that it is experienced subconsciously in events and activities that are a part of daily life. Learning and instruction take place in the home, in churches, in the community, and from private entrepreneurs, as well as in schools. Thus, learning and teaching in music are heavily dependent on cooperation between parents and community, and on tradition and custom.
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by Paul Woodford
This chapter seeks to draw needed attention to some of music’s social and political meanings by way of illustrating how it contributes to the shaping of people’s perceptions and understandings of their world.
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by Patrick K. Schmidt
The rationale for an education in and through music that this chapter provides is centered on place, arguing that it can offer a rupture in persistently reproductive patterns within education. It does so by considering place as an influential construct in the development of our capacities for reflective praxis.
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by David E. Myers
This chapter frames issues of adult music learning within a lifespan perspective. A lifespan perspective does not segment adult music education into a specialized practice of highly differentiated strategies from those of childhood; rather, it envisions seamless relationships among music learning in educational settings, people’s self-initiated lifelong music experiences outside such settings, and the assurance of richly diverse and developmentally appropriate opportunities for continued music learning through adulthood.
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by Patrick M. Jones
The key issues that challenge collegiate music education programs reviewed in this chapter include changing demographics and tastes in music; transformation of the music industry; new technologies that alter the way people interact, access information, and engage musically; cultural and financial changes in higher education; changing expectations for primary and secondary schools; and nonschool providers of music education services.
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by Graça Mota
This chapter aims to introduce a critical reflection on the field of music education in higher education, using the Bologna Declaration and the European context as a backdrop.
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by Carlos Xavier Rodriguez
In this chapter, I share my thoughts regarding the future role of popular music in music education at a moment when there seems to be greater receptiveness to this idea than ever before.
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by Cathy Benedict
It is the goal and the purpose on which the utopia is based that merit attention. As such, in this chapter, I engage in what Gilroy (in Shelby & Gilroy, 2008) referred to as a “utopian exercise” in order to think through our3 “romance with” (p. 134) music as “part of the core curriculum” and as “balanced, comprehensive, and sequential” (National Association for Music Education [NAfME], 2011b).
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by Cecila Ferm Thorgersen & Eva Georgii-Hemming
This chapter takes into account and discusses innovative learning in the 21st digital and communicative century based on life-world-phenomenology and Hannah Arendt’s view of democracy. From this point of view, we address and discuss how democratic practices can offer innovative musical learning in relation to what is taking place in research and educational projects in Sweden and the Nordic countries.
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by Lauri Väkevä
In this chapter, I will argue that (1) mediation is one of the most important aspects of digital artistry and that (2) the pedagogical implications of recognizing this are significant concerns to music educators (see also Väkevä, 2006, 2009, 2010).
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by Matthew D. Thibeault
This chapter argues for the critical engagement of the music education profession to amplify positive change. This is a pragmatic view of technological change (Hickman, 2001; Waddington, 2010) that emphasizes agency within the interplay of wants, needs, values, and practices as people change and are changed by technological innovation.
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by Cathy Benedict
Each of the authors in this Yearbook spoke to the multiple responsibilities and challenges of education in our contemporary society, each of which intersects the internal needs and realities of our nation-state, the demands of information technology growth, as well as the economic codependency and the cultural changes fostered by global interactions.
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