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Volume 117, Number 10 (2015)

by Lori A. Custodero
In this Introduction, the contextual background, organization, and contents of the issue are provided.
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by Keith Sawyer
Drawing on the history of research on teaching creativity and on arts education, the article argues that the best way to teach for creativity is to transform domain specific education, in each subject area. This requires schools to change the way each subject is taught, so that learning outcomes support the learner’s ability to create within each specific subject. The most effective learning environments are characterized by emergent, improvisational, and collaborative pedagogical structures.
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by Sharon Bailin
This commentary argues that creativity is best viewed in terms of significant achievement and that such achievement is best developed through promoting critical inquiry.
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by Srikala Naraian
This commentary notes the oppositional traditions that inform polarized perspectives on disability and schooling, and raises the question of the significance of such divisions for schools and for preparing teachers. Drawing on an international collaborative experience involving competing knowledge traditions the creative possibilities of uncertainty and ambiguity for reforming schools are explored.
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by Olga M. Hubard
Excerpts form a conversation on creativity with Olga Hubard, conducted prior to a symposium on the same topic at Teachers College, are interwoven with artworks by Hubard's students and professional artists.
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by Erick Gordon & Ruth Vinz
This commentary details the creative process of New York City teachers and students coming together as players to remix Mary Shelley's Frankenstein in the summer of 2014.
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by Beth A. Hennessey
Extrinsic incentives or constraints including the promise of a reward or the expectation of an evaluation have long been used by educators to motivate students. While extrinsic incentives do, in fact, help to ensure that work gets done and that it gets done on time, caution must be exercised when creativity is at stake. In teaching and learning situations where there is one “right” answer and one best path to solution, extrinsic incentives can be extremely effective. However, when more open-ended problems and activities are presented to students, these same extrinsic incentives have been shown to kill Western students’ intrinsic motivation and creativity. In the face of an expected reward or performance evaluation, students are unlikely to take risks and tend not to be fueled by an excitement about learning that would allow them to persist with challenging tasks until they achieve a creative outcome. The complexities of the relation between task motivation and performance outcomes are reviewed and cross-cultural implications are explored.
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by Sandra Okita
Many technological artifacts (e.g., humanoid robots, computer agents) consist of biologically inspired features of human-like appearance and behaviors that elicit a social response. The strong social components of technology permit people to share information and ideas with these artifacts. As robots cross the boundaries between humans and machines, the features of human interactions can be replicated to reveal new insights into the role of social relationships in learning and creativity. Peer robots can be designed to create ideal circumstances that enable new ways for students to reflect, reason, and learn. This, in turn, has increased expectations that robots and computer agents will enhance human learning and complement people’s physical, social, and cognitive capabilities. This paper explores how peer-like robots and robotic systems may help students learn and engage in creative ways of thinking.
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by Monisha Bajaj
This article how human rights education can utilize creative and innovative approaches for meaningful learning among marginalized communities. Specifically, the approach of one non-governmental organization in India is reviewed and presented as an example of how educators and those interested in imparting knowledge of basic rights can advance a transformative form of human rights education through innovative curricula, pedagogy and co-curricular efforts.
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by Kwami Coleman
This is a response essay to an interview with George E. Lewis, the Edwin H. Case Professor of American Music at Columbia University, conducted by Cara Furman of Teachers College. The essay explores Lewis's thoughts on quotidian creativity and the ubiquity of improvisation, their necessity in academic institutions, and their potentially life-transforming effects for all people.
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by Nick Sousanis & Daiyu Suzuki
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