Computer Literacy and Ideology


by Douglas Noble — 1984

The need for some form of computer literacy has come to be accepted as an essential condition of everyday life, now that the computer has insinuated itself into our jobs, our schools, and our homes. As a result, computer-literacy education has become very big business, evidenced by the myriad of computer classes, workshops, and camps available to people of all ages. The purpose of all this training, we are told, is not to make engineers or programmers of everyone; rather, its focus is on a minimal level of instruction that will introduce the masses to the ubiquitous computer and enable them to feel “comfortable," to have “a sense of belonging in a computer-rich society."


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 85 Number 4, 1984, p. 602-614
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 853, Date Accessed: 10/22/2017 7:06:20 PM

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