Race and Ethnicity in the Teacher Education Curriculum


by William Trent ó 1990

William Trent presents a series of arguments for his proposal that the importance of race and ethnicity in education should become a primary area of study for the prospective teacher. Trent notes recent research showing that blacks and Hispanics are among those groups least well served by schooling in the United States, yet these groups will constitute an ever-increasing proportion of students. The problem is exacerbated, in Trentís view, by the opposite trend in the proportion of minority students who will be teachers, necessitating new understandings and new approachesfor majority-population teachers who will be called on to teach increasing numbers of minority youth.


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 91 Number 3, 1990, p. 361-369
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 410, Date Accessed: 12/15/2017 10:37:47 PM

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