American Indian Education as Cultural Transaction


by Murray Wax — 1963

If during the several centuries in which they have been in contact, much of the interaction between American Indians and whites (Europeans) has centered about trade, warfare, and the eviction of the Indian peoples from their homelands, an equally constant theme has been education. From the Spanish and French missionaries until the present day, the whites have been concerned to educate the Indian. Usually, this has implied not simply the imparting of literacy, technical skills, or academic lore, but the transmutation of his culture and personality—from a heathen into a Christian, from an economic collectivist into an individualist, and, in the case of the nomadic groups, from a hunter into a settled and diligent farmer.


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 64 Number 8, 1963, p. 693-693
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 2902, Date Accessed: 12/13/2017 11:46:35 AM

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