Culture and Processes Affecting Data Use in School Districts


by William A. Firestone & Raymond González — 2007

School districts occupy a special place in the American educational system. They are the locus of accountability to both local and state government. In recent decades, this has meant that they have a responsibility to mobilize evidence to demonstrate that students are being educated (often in a cost-effective manner). As districts grow beyond a certain size, they take on certain staff functions related to curriculum and the support of teaching, so they house experts who use evidence about student achievement to make decisions. Finally, their staff roles often extend to collecting, analyzing, interpreting, and distributing data, especially student assessment or testing data.


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This article originally appeared as NSSE Yearbook Vol 106. No. 1.


Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 109 Number 13, 2007, p. 132-154
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 18485, Date Accessed: 10/24/2017 3:34:18 AM

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