Introduction


by Hugh Sockett & Robert R. Boostrom — 2013

Putting the word moral in the title of this volume carries some risk, because moral is an unusually slippery as well as powerfully evocative word. For some, it is a grim and proper word, suggesting the constraint of a moralistic or rule-bound view of life, summed up in a narrow compendium of “thou shalt not’s.” For others, it is a sacred word that implies (as it did for many of the early supporters of the common school in the US) the necessary superiority of Christianity over any other view of life. For others, it is a nostalgic word, calling to mind a better day and bringing an invitation to lament the decline of civility or the corruption of the social order.


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This article originally appeared as NSSE Yearbook Vol 112. No. 1.


Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 115 Number 13, 2013, p. 1-7
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 18312, Date Accessed: 12/11/2017 5:39:24 PM

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