High School Reform, Again


by Floyd M Hammack — May 02, 2005

I do not intend to defend the comprehensive high school, but do want to highlight how the problem that brought it into existence is exactly the problem that plagues it a hundred years later. An understanding of this fact helps bring high school reform efforts into better focus. It is clear that organizational reforms, such as smaller schools, or career-focused curricula, are not the answer, nor can it be asserted that “more expert” teachers will somehow be better able to teach the incredibly diverse high school student body. All of these efforts may well help, but they are at least one step removed from where the real action takes place: in classrooms, between teachers and students.


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record, Date Published: May 02, 2005
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 11853, Date Accessed: 12/16/2017 5:33:40 PM

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