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Volume 116, Number 6, 2014

Featured Articles
by Alejandro Covarrubias & Daniel Liou
After decades of research that repudiates the thesis of Asian Americans as model minorities, the visibility of Asian Americans in higher education continues to reinforce essentialist paradigms about their presumed success. This article presents the most recent educational pipeline for Asian Americans while examining disparities in attainment across race, class, gender, citizenship, and earning power as a method to further policy discussions on education and civil rights.

by Srikala Naraian
This paper reviews data from multiple sites to disclose teachers’ practices at the confluence of multiple discourses that collectively construct inclusion in uncertain terms. It suggests that teacher agency for inclusion is situated within the contradictions of everyday schooling practice and offers a framing of inclusion that is grounded in such conditions.

by Laura Bray, Alicia Mrachko & Christopher Lemons
In this qualitative case study, we examined the writing opportunities provided to students in four eighth-grade English classrooms at a full inclusion middle school.

by Drew Gitomer, Courtney Bell, Yi Qi, Daniel McCaffrey, Bridget Hamre & Robert Pianta
Using an observation protocol designed to measure classroom interactions, we find that the quality of instructional and emotional support in algebra classrooms is much weaker than classroom organization. These differences parallel observers’ relative strengths and weaknesses in reliably evaluating practice. Our finding that certain aspects of teaching are carried out better than others and observed with more consistency has implications for the evaluation and improvement of teaching.

by Min Sun, Anne Garrison Wilhelm, Christine Larson & Kenneth Frank
This study examines how middle school teachers’ networks influence their mathematical knowledge for teaching (MKT) and instructional practices. We also examined how mathematics coaches’ expertise, in the form of MKT, plays a role in augmenting the extent to which teachers learn through interacting with close colleagues. Drawing on longitudinal data from a larger NSF-funded project that has worked with 29 middle schools in four large, urban districts, we used multilevel linear models with cross-level interaction effects and in-depth sensitivity analyses of the effects of close colleagues and coaches. Our results show that changes in teachers’ instructional practice were positively related to their access to instructional expertise through interactions with close colleagues. But we did not find a similar significantly positive association between changes in teachers’ MKT and access to their close colleagues’ MKT expertise. Rather, coaches’ MKT expertise positively moderated the extent to which teachers learned MKT from their close colleagues through seeking advice on teaching mathematics; that is, having an expert coach in the school enhanced the MKT learning opportunities that teachers had from interacting with close colleagues. Results from this study shed light on how to support teachers’ on-the-job learning and successfully implement ambitious instructional reforms in schools.

by Sara Levy
This qualitative case study examines how students understand and identify with histories with which they have a heritage connection when they learn about the histories from multiple, possibly conflicting, sources: their families and the formal public school curriculum.

by Arlo Kempf
This article examines the way Cuban teachers address racism in their professional practice, with a specific focus on teacher home visits to address issues of racism with parents and guardians. Using critical race theory and a reconsideration of the ecological systems theory, this article analyzes the relationship between Cuban teachers and the families of students they teach based on in-depth interviews and a survey of Cuban teachers.

by Ebony McGee
In this article the author explores the mathematics and life experiences of 13 Black elementary education pre-service college students, encompassing both their reflections as students of mathematics and as future mathematics teachers of most likely Black and Latino students. Their “voices” suggest that these Black pre-service students generated constructions that include considerations of race and racism as part of their shared African American experience in the United States; that is, a mathematics learning experience and future mathematics-based teaching ideologies structured, in part, by larger negative and unjust race relations existing in US culture, in spite of early at-home mathematics support.

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