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Troubling Messages: Agency and Learning in the Early Schooling Experiences of Children of Latina/o Immigrants


by Jennifer Keys Adair, Kiyomi Sánchez-Suzuki Colegrove & Molly McManus — 2018


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 120 Number 6, 2018, p. -
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 22155, Date Accessed: 10/23/2017 12:58:52 PM
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About the Author
  • Jennifer Adair
    The University of Texas at Austin
    E-mail Author
    JENNIFER KEYS ADAIR, PhD, is Associate Professor of Early Childhood Education at The University of Texas at Austin. Her work focuses on the connection between agency and discrimination in the early learning experiences of children of immigrants. As a young scholar fellow with the Foundation of Child Development and a major grant recipient of the Spencer Foundation, she is working with parents, teachers, administrators, and young children to improve the learning experiences of young children from marginalized communities. Her areas of expertise include early childhood education, immigrant parent engagement, project-based learning, and the importance of young children exploring racial and cultural differences. She has received many awards for her research and published findings in a wide range of journals including Harvard Educational Review, Teachers College Record, Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood Education, Young Children, Journal of Early Childhood Teacher Education and Race, Ethnicity and Education.
  • Kiyomi Colegrove
    Texas State University
    E-mail Author
    KIYOMI SÁNCHEZ-SUZUKI COLEGROVE, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Bilingual Bicultural Education and Early Childhood Education at Texas State University. Her work centers on the curricular and pedagogical preferences of Latino immigrant parents and the relationship between home and school in the early grades. Using videocued ethnography, she studies how parents’ ideas, beliefs, and experiences compare across schools, communities and contexts. Her research privileges the voices and ideas of Latino immigrant parents and demonstrates ways in which administrators, teachers and policymakers can learn from and develop reciprocal relationships with immigrant families. Her areas of expertise include early childhood education, Latino immigrant parent engagement, and bilingual education. She has published findings in a range of journals including Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood Education and Asia-Pacific Journal of Research in Early Childhood Education.
  • Molly McManus
    The University of Texas at Austin
    E-mail Author
    MOLLY MCMANUS, MA, is a doctoral student of Educational Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research explores the ways that early childhood contexts affect schooling experiences and the development of young immigrant and otherwise marginalized children. She is also interested in the experiences of parents as they navigate complex sociocultural and bureaucratic systems to support the development, education, and well-being of their young children. Before her graduate studies, she worked as a Spanish–English bilingual second-grade teacher in Oakland, California.
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