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A Framework for the Initiation of Networked Improvement Communities


by Jennifer Lin Russell, Anthony S. Bryk, Jonathan R. Dolle, Louis M. Gomez, Paul G. Lemahieu & Alicia Grunow — 2017


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 119 Number 5, 2017, p. 1-36
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 21784, Date Accessed: 12/16/2017 1:55:46 PM
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About the Author
  • Jennifer Russell
    University of Pittsburgh
    E-mail Author
    JENNIFER LIN RUSSELL, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Learning Sciences and Policy in the School of Education and a Research Scientist at the Learning Research and Development Center at the University of Pittsburgh. She studies policy implementation and other planned change efforts through an organizational perspective. Her current work examines how educators get support from their professional networks and interactions with more expert others such as coaches to support mathematics instructional improvement and investigates how schools organize to support students with special needs. Recent publications include, “Designing Inter-organizational Networks to Implement Education Reform: An Analysis of State Race to the Top Applications,” Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis (2015) and “Theories and Methodologies for Design-based Implementation Research: Examples from Four Cases,” National Society for Study of Education Yearbook (2013).
  • Anthony Bryk
    Carnegie Foundation
    E-mail Author
    ANTHONY S. BRYK is the ninth President of the Carnegie Foundation, where he is leading work on transforming educational research and development, more closely joining researchers and practitioners to improve teaching and learning. He recently published Bryk, A. S., Gomez, L. M., Grunow, A., and LeMahieu, P. G. Learning to Improve: How America’s schools can get better at getting better (2015, Harvard Education Press).
  • Jonathan Dolle
    WestEd
    E-mail Author
    JONATHAN R. DOLLE is Senior Research Associate at WestEd where he provides strategic leadership to REL West and Innovation Studies to foster field partnerships focused on meaningful improvement goals. His current work focuses on how to develop, manage, and scale organization- and network-based learning systems that can reliably improve quality outcomes. Prior to joining WestEd, Dolle worked at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching where he focused on initiating, developing, and scaling the Community College Pathways networked improvement community. Recent publications include "More than a Network: Building Communities for Educational Improvement," National Society for Study of Education Yearbook (2013) and "Value-free Ideal for Research: Controversies" Encyclopedia of Educational Theory and Philosophy (2014).
  • Louis M. Gomez
    University of California, Los Angeles
    LOUIS M. GOMEZ is Professor of Education and Information Studies at UCLA. He is also a Senior Fellow at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. He is interested in helping schools and communities of schools improve through the collaborative creation of new approaches to teaching, learning, and assessment. His work has often employed design, development, and engineering techniques in these efforts to help schools improve. His recent publications include “Learning to Improve: How America’s Schools Can Get Better at Getting Better” (2015) and “Embedding Language Support in Developmental Mathematics Lessons: Exploring the Value of Design as Professional Development for Community College,” Mathematics Instructors (2015).
  • Paul Lemahieu
    Carnegie Foundation
    E-mail Author
    PAUL G. LEMAHIEU is Senior Vice President for Programs at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. His recent professional interests focus on the reconceptualization of the research and development enterprise in education that integrates improvement science with the power of networks. Recent publications include: Bryk, A. S., Gomez, L. M., Grunow, A., and LeMahieu, P. G. Learning to Improve: How America’s Schools Can Get Better at Getting Better (2015, Harvard Education Press) and LeMahieu, P. G, Edwards, A. R., and Gomez, L. M. “At the Nexus of Improvement Science and Teaching: A Special Section of the Journal of Teacher Education.” (2015, AACTE).
  • Alicia Grunow
    Carnegie Foundation
    E-mail Author
    ALICIA GRUNOW is a senior partner and director of the improvement science and analytics group at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. She both studies and works with organizations to build their capacity in improvement science and analytics. Her recent professional interests focus on how to structure and lead professional collaborations in ways that make it more likely that they lead to results. She recently published Bryk, A. S., Gomez, L. M., Grunow, A., and LeMahieu, P. G. Learning to Improve: How America’s Schools Can Get Better at Getting Better (2015, Harvard Education Press).
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