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Help Avoidance: When Students Should Seek Help, and the Consequences of Failing to Do So


by Victoria Q. Almeda, Ryan S. J. D. Baker & Albert Corbett — 2017


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 119 Number 3, 2017, p. 1-24
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 21775, Date Accessed: 10/17/2017 9:54:28 PM
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About the Author
  • Victoria Almeda
    Teachers College, Columbia University
    E-mail Author
    VICTORIA Q. ALMEDA is a Ph.D. student in Cognitive Studies in Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. Her research interests include student engagement, Intelligent Tutoring Systems, and math learning. Her recent work includes “Classroom Activities and Off-Task Behavior in Elementary School Children,” in Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, and “Clustering of Design Decisions in Classroom Visual Displays,” in Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Learning Analytics and Knowledge.
  • Ryan Baker
    Teachers College, Columbia University
    E-mail Author
    RYAN S. BAKER is an Associate Professor of Cognitive Studies and Program Coordinator for Learning Analytics at Teachers College, Columbia University. His research interests include student engagement, robust learning, metacognition, educational data mining, and learning analytics. His recent publications include “Modeling How Incoming Knowledge, Persistence, Affective States, and In-Game Progress Influence Student Learning from an Educational Game,” in Computers & Education, and “Cross-System Transfer of Machine Learned and Knowledge Engineered Models of Gaming the System,” in Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on User Modeling, Adaptation, and Personalization.
  • Albert Corbett
    Carnegie Mellon University
    E-mail Author
    ALBERT CORBETT is an Associate Research Professor Emeritus in the Human-Computer Interaction Institute, Carnegie Mellon University. His principal research interest is cognitive models of problem solving, and he has conducted extensive empirical evaluations of students learning programming, mathematics, and genetics with intelligent computer tutors. He has recently published “A Cognitive Tutor for Genetics Problem Solving: Learning Gains and Student Modeling,” in Journal of Educational Computing Research.
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