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The Relationships Among High School STEM Learning Experiences and Students’ Intent to Declare and Declaration of a STEM Major in College


by Martha Cecilia Bottia, Elizabeth Stearns, Roslyn Arlin Mickelson, Stephanie Moller & Ashley Dawn Parker — 2015


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Cite This Article as: Teachers College Record Volume 117 Number 3, 2015, p. 1-46
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 17806, Date Accessed: 10/21/2017 5:28:11 PM
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About the Author
  • Martha Bottia
    University of North Carolina at Charlotte
    E-mail Author
    MARTHA CECILIA BOTTIA is assistant research professor of sociology at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Her research interests include the effects of school racial and socioeconomic demographic composition on various educational outcomes. She has also worked on articles related to the unequal impact of the curriculum on diverse students and on the education of Latino students. Currently, her research focuses on the role of structural characteristics of K–12 schools on the decision of students to select and graduate with a STEM major. Her other research interests include illicit drugs and terrorist organizations. Recent articles have been published in Review of Educational Research, Elementary School Journal, and Sociology of Education.
  • Elizabeth Stearns
    University of North Carolina at Charlotte
    E-mail Author
    ELIZABETH STEARNS is associate professor of sociology and public policy at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Her research interests include the interplay between structural characteristics of schools and student outcomes, including gender and racial disparities in student achievement and attainment. Recent articles have been published in Social Science Research, Gender and Education, and Sociology of Education.
  • Roslyn Mickelson
    University of North Carolina at Charlotte
    E-mail Author
    ROSLYN ARLIN MICKELSON is professor of sociology, public policy, women and gender studies, and information technology at UNC Charlotte (RoslynMickelson@uncc.edu). Her interests include the social, cultural, and organizational contexts that support or hinder adolescents’ success in STEM fields. Her book Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow. The Past, Present, and Future of (De)segregation in Charlotte, coedited with Stephen Samuel Smith and Amy Hawn Nelson, will be published by Harvard Education Press in 2014.
  • Stephanie Moller
    University of North Carolina at Charlotte
    E-mail Author
    STEPHANIE MOLLER is associate professor of sociology and public policy at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. She conducts research on income inequality within the United States and cross-nationally. She also conducts research on mathematics achievement in primary and secondary schools, examining racial, ethnic and socioeconomic gaps in achievement. Dr. Moller has published numerous articles, including articles in the American Sociological Review, American Journal of Sociology, Social Forces, Sociology of Education, and World Politics.
  • Ashley Parker
    Teach For America
    E-mail Author
    ASHLEY DAWN PARKER is a managing director of teacher leadership development for Teach For America in Oklahoma City. Her research interests include the achievement gap in middle and secondary science education and teacher quality in urban schools. She has also worked on articles related to the impact of science identity formation and familial experiences of African American female STEM students within the North Carolina public university system. Currently, her research focuses on teacher preparation factors that influence science achievement in urban school districts within the state of Oklahoma, specifically for African American females.
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